The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black

GoodReads Summary:
Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.
Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.
At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.
Until one day, he does…
As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?
The Darkest Part of the ForestReview:
The Darkest Part of the Forest takes place in the same world as the Folk of the Air trilogy. Many were disappointed by the finale of that series and to those people I say, READ THIS BOOK RIGHT NOW. The Darkest Part of the Forest was everything I wanted from the Folk of the Air series. There were interesting and complex sibling relationships. There were romantic relationships that I was quickly invested in. Plus, there was all the fae drama that I loved from her other series, but more interesting.
The fae aspect of this story was so fascinating. This story takes place in the town of Fairfold where the fae come out to play with tourists. I loved this aspect of the story. The concept of magic in the world as I know it is so interesting to me. The fae in town don’t mess with the locals, only the tourists that come to see the horned boy in the glass coffin. The horned boy’s coffin is also the local’s party spot. This hit me in the high school feels because I totally partied in the woods during my high school years, so, I could totally see my friends in the party scenes with the horned boy.
When the coffin is found shattered and the horned boy awakes, life in Fairfold changes. I loved the relationship between Hazel and Ben. I really enjoyed getting to see their history. When they were children, they hunted fae with Ben using his musical ability and Hazel fighting them. There were some hard to read parts with these parts, but it just made the story that much better. Their relationship was so complicated and tangled, there were a lot of issues between them but I loved seeing them work through these issues and develop their relationships.
The romances were wonderful. I’m not going to specify who is with who because the wondering (for me) was a great part of the book. Both siblings find romance in these pages. Ben is gay and his romance was everything I wanted and more. The way his path led in this story was everything I wanted from Jude and Cardan. Hazel’s romance was also right up my alley. It was my favorite romance trope and I love how things turned out for them.
Overall, this book was so freaking good. I don’t know why more people haven’t read this. To all of the people that read and loved The Cruel Prince, please read this book because you will love this even more. The supporting characters were amazing. The mix of real-world and fae was great. I just loved everything about this book.

 

Quotes:

“Once, there was a girl who vowed she would save everyone in the world, but forgot herself.”

“Every child needs a tragedy to become truly interesting.”

“Down a path worn into the woods, past a stream and a hollowed-out log full of pill bugs and termites, was a glass coffin. It rested right on the ground, and in it slept a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives.”

“There don’t have to be first dates and second dates. We’re not normal. We can do this anyway you want. A relationship can be whatever you want it to be. We get to make this part up. We get to tell our own story.”

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.