The Space Between Worlds by Micaiah Johnson

GoodReads Summary:
Multiverse travel is finally possible, but there’s just one catch: No one can visit a world where their counterpart is still alive. Enter Cara, whose parallel selves happen to be exceptionally good at dying—from disease, turf wars, or vendettas they couldn’t outrun. Cara’s life has been cut short on 372 worlds in total.
On this Earth, however, Cara has survived. Identified as an outlier and therefore a perfect candidate for multiverse travel, Cara is plucked from the dirt of the wastelands. Now she has a nice apartment on the lower levels of the wealthy and walled-off Wiley City. She works—and shamelessly flirts—with her enticing yet aloof handler, Dell, as the two women collect off-world data for the Eldridge Institute. She even occasionally leaves the city to visit her family in the wastes, though she struggles to feel at home in either place. So long as she can keep her head down and avoid trouble, Cara is on a sure path to citizenship and security.
But trouble finds Cara when one of her eight remaining doppelgängers dies under mysterious circumstances, plunging her into a new world with an old secret. What she discovers will connect her past and her future in ways she could have never imagined—and reveal her own role in a plot that endangers not just her world, but the entire multiverse.
The Space Between WorldsReview:
The Space Between Worlds is a story that completely sucked me in. I was so hooked almost immediately. I think the author did so many things right in this story. Cara is a ‘traverser’ meaning she is one of the people that travel to alternate realities. She’s a pretty valuable asset to the company she works for because in this book you can only travel to alternate realities that your counterpart is no longer living. Cara is only alive in seven other realities. So, she’s able to travel to most of the other realities. She’s also training to become an analyst because there are rumors that the company will be announcing soon that they now have a way to collect the data remotely instead of using their traversers. She needs to be able to stay in the city for a certain amount of time so she can gain residency in the city or she will have to return to a home that isn’t familiar to her.
Things get exciting when Cara is sent to a reality where her counterpart is still alive. This scene where Cara is arriving was so intense. This book excelled at having great action and excitement, but not so much that it was non-stop. When Cara is fighting to stay alive after arriving in a reality she never should have traveled to, I was gripping the book so hard. I’d become so invested in Cara and her secrets. Cara is a really complicated character. She has secrets and I would definitely consider her to be a bit morally grey. She’s had a hard life and she’s doing everything she can to make a better future for herself. She’s done some not great things, but I found that I couldn’t help but really like her anyway. Cara manages to survive the horrible repercussions of traveling to a reality where her other was still alive with the help of someone from her past. But in this universe, he is completely different. Cara learns some valuable secrets while she’s in this reality and she uses them when she returns.
This book was incredible. I think it did a great job of highlighting the inequalities of this world. For example, most of the traversers are people from poor areas because these groups of people are more likely to die in their environments than those that have families who have lives in the cities for generations. This was a really interesting aspect of the story. I also really enjoyed that we got to see some of the other alternate realities or at least hear about them. I thought it was really interesting to see the different potential lives of Cara. I also really enjoyed the romance, if you can call it that. Cara cares for her handler, Dell, but she has all of these things she thinks because Dell has money and her family has lived in the city for generations. But we eventually learn the reason for Dell’s behavior and it was such a great example of people letting assumptions guide their thoughts and actions.
There were some really interesting family dynamics as well. I can’t say too much about it because part of the dynamic has to do with Cara’s biggest secret. But I really liked seeing how her family lived and seeing her relationship with her sister grow.
One last thing I want to mention is the mythology, I don’t know that mythology is the correct word for what I’m talking about but that’s what I’m going to use. This aspect of the story was so interesting. Cara has learned the mythology of a goddess (I think) from her mentor, an analyst that used to be a traverser. He’s told her about his beliefs and she’s taken them as her own. When she is traversing, she feels this goddess holding Cara in her arms and transporting her. I really enjoyed these parts of the story because they were really thoughtful and it was a way for Cara to think about things differently.
I just cannot say enough good things about this book. It might just end up on my 2020 favorites list. I cannot wait to see what Johnson will write next. I really hope to see more from this world.

Quotes:

“I guess it’s easy to be confident when you’re helpless, easy to be fearless when you have nothing left to lose.”

“Because that’s what a sister is: a piece of yourself you can finally love, because it’s in someone else.”

“They say hunting monsters will turn you into one. That isn’t what’s happening now. Sometimes to kill a dragon, you have to remember that you breath fire too. This isn’t a becoming; its a revealing. I’ve been a monster all along”

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Seven Devils by Laura Lam & Elizabeth May

GoodReads Summary:
This first book in a feminist space opera duology follows seven resistance fighters who will free the galaxy from the ruthless Tholosian Empire — or die trying.
When Eris faked her death, she thought she had left her old life as the heir to the galaxy’s most ruthless empire behind. But her recruitment by the Novantaen Resistance, an organization opposed to the empire’s voracious expansion, throws her right back into the fray.
Eris has been assigned a new mission: to infiltrate a spaceship ferrying deadly cargo and return the intelligence gathered to the Resistance. But her partner for the mission, mechanic and hotshot pilot Cloelia, bears an old grudge against Eris, making an already difficult infiltration even more complicated.
When they find the ship, they discover more than they bargained for: three fugitives with firsthand knowledge of the corrupt empire’s inner workings.
Together, these women possess the knowledge and capabilities to bring the empire to its knees. But the clock is ticking: the new heir to the empire plans to disrupt a peace summit with the only remaining alien empire, ensuring the empire’s continued expansion. If they can find a way to stop him, they will save the galaxy. If they can’t, millions may die.
Seven Devils (Seven Devils, #1)Review:
Seven Devils is a book that Antonia brought to my attention earlier in the fall and I’m so glad that she did. I absolutely devoured this book. The story is told from a few different perspectives. This is something that can either make or break a story. There are many books where the multiple perspectives all blend together, this was not one of those cases. Each character was distinct and I was never confused about whose perspective I was reading. I think the writing was really good. This world they created was so fascinating and well built.
We follow some members of the resistance that have history with one another from before the book starts. Eris and Clo worked together for the resistance in the past. Clo learned Eris’s biggest secret and the two haven’t worked together since. But there is a mission they must work together to fulfill and that’s where this story starts. Clo is angry that she has to work with Eris. I really enjoyed that we got chapters from both the present and the past for many of the characters. We got to see exactly what happened between Eris and Clo. I liked Eris. I liked her even more after learning about her past and her secrets. I just genuinely liked all of the characters. We meet the rest of our squad a little way into the story. I liked that it worked like this because we got to settle into the world and get to know Eris and Clo and figure out what was going on before three more characters were added. I liked the three friends that became a part of the crew. They each added something different, but equally important. I thought all the characters had such an interesting dynamic as a group because the three friends knew one another, but they were unsure about Eris and Clo. There wasn’t much trust, but it was really wonderful seeing these characters learn to trust one another individually and as a group.
Overall, this was such a good story. I loved that the story jumped back and forth between the past and the present (and was clearly labeled when it did this). I loved the group of characters that needed to learn to work together and trust one another. I loved the secrets that eventually came out. There were slower moments, but there were also some pretty high stakes. The representation was also wonderful. I can’t speak to the accuracy of the representation but I do want to mention what was in this story. One of the leaders of the rebellion is a trans woman. There is a romantic relationship between two women (this was my favorite and the story was so casual about it which I loved). There’s an autistic character. There’s bisexual representation and ace representation. I cannot wait for this series to continue. I will definitely be reading more by both May and Lam.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

#SciFiMonth: Favorite Tropes in Science Fiction

ARTWORK by Tithi Luadthong from 123RF.com.

Hello, lovelies! Today I want to talk about tropes that I love within the science fiction genre. I don’t know if tropes is really the correct word, but it’s what I’m going with and you will all see what I’m talking about when you read a bit further. There are a few topics I just love to read about when it comes to the sci-fi I pick up.

End of the world storylines (dystopian) – By this I mean, the world has ended in some scenario. Some of my favorites are climate change, illness that change the world as we know it, and world ending wars (not that I like this, but it makes for an interesting story usually.) There are others but these are the few that pop into my head.
Some recommendations: This Mortal Coil by Emily Suvada, The Final Six by Alexandra Monir, The 100 by Kiss Morgan, The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, Tarnished Are the Stars by Rosiee Thor, The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin, Internment by Samira Ahmed, Dry by Neal Shusterman, Year One by Nora Roberts, The Fever King by Victoria Lee andScythe by Neal Shusterman.

Space Squads (also known as found family) – I love the found family trope in any genre, but it’s a great one in science fiction. There’s something about a bunch of people coming together and making their own family that hits me in the heart. I love seeing the relationships grow and develop into something wonderful.
Some recommendations: The Disasters by M.K. England, Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff, The Angel Experiment by James Patterson (I haven’t read this in a really long time, so take this with a grain of salt), and Sal and Gabi Break the Universe by Carlos Hernandez.

Aliens – I’ve always been a sucker for alien stories. What really would happen if aliens came to earth? I just love reading about all the potential human reactions, positive and negative. There are so many different kinds of alien stories out there, which I think is why this is one of my favorites.
Some recommendations: Obsidian by Jennifer L. Armentrout, An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green, Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel, and When the Sky Fell on Splendor by Emily Henry (this is only sort of aliens, but I loved it.)

Time Travel – Time travel is one of those things that I think many people dream about. If I could go back in time and see anyone I wanted, I already know who I would go to see. There are so many complexities to the idea of time travel that it makes my brain hurt, but I still love it.
Some recommendations: Here and Now and Then by Mike Chen, This is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar & Max Gladstone, The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton, and The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North.

Alternate Realities/Histories – This one is a topic I didn’t know I loved until more recently. I’ve read some really great stories with people traveling to alternate realities or stories that are the story of how things would be if one thing changed in history. It’s almost dystopian and almost fantasy and I almost always enjoy it.
Some recommendations: The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal, The Strangers by Margaret Peterson Haddix, and American Royals by Katharine McGee.

Superheroes – Who doesn’t love superheroes? I love the creativity with all the different abilities and the potential for what the world looks like when people have these abilities.
Some recommendations: Vicious by V.E. Schwab, Renegades by Marissa Meyer, The Extraordinaries by T.J. Klune, and Zeroes by Scott Westerfeld, Deborah Biancotti, & Margo Lanagan.

Off Earth – This is a more general topic in science fiction, but there are so many great books that fit the generalization of books not on earth. Some are space operas, some are not. I love books that are sci-fi, but none of the above.
Some recommendations: The Martian by Andy Weir, The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers, The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin, Bonds of Brass by Emily Strutski, Skyward by Brandon Sanderson, Zodiac by Romina Russell, Mirage by Somaiya Daud, and Dragon Pearl by Yoon Ha Lee.

These are some of my favorite things to read about when I pick up a science fiction book or series, along with some recommendations of my favorites within each topic. I could literally talk about this for a million years, so I tried to keep it on the shorter side. Tell me in the comments about your favorite science fiction tropes or topics.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The First 7 by Laura Pohl

GoodReads Summary:
Clover Martinez and The Last Teenagers on Earth are busy exploring the galaxy after leaving earth behind…even if they can’t help but be a little homesick.
So when their ship receives a distress signal from their former planet, they hope against hope that it means other survivors. But as soon as they arrive, they realize something’s deeply wrong: strange crystal formations have popped up everywhere and there’s some sort of barrier keeping them from leaving.
Seeking the origin of the formations and the reason for the barrier, the group discovers a colony of survivors hidden in the mountains. But the survivors aren’t who they seem…
The First 7 (The Last 8, #2)Review:
I enjoyed The Last 8 so much that I immediately had to start the audiobook for book two, The First 7. I loved The First 7 so much that I listened to the entire audiobook in one afternoon.
I loved this book for the characters. I enjoyed the plot and the whole storyline, but I was so invested in the characters and oh boy, was there drama with this found family. I’ll mention the storyline first and then I can get into what I actually want to talk about today. I was interested in the storyline. At the end of book one, our characters travel into space. At the start of this book, we get to see the characters in space after exploring for several months. There is an altercation toward one of the Last Teenagers and they leave the planet they’re on. When they return to their ship, they receive a distress signal. A distress signal that was coming from Earth. They argue about whether or not to return and see what or who sent this signal.
After returning to Earth, they realize that they weren’t the last humans on Earth. Other people survived. They arrive near the community called Unity. But they soon have more problems to solve than they bargained for. Something happens to one of their friends that they need to figure out and there is this barrier preventing them from going back into space. I will say that I completely saw through one of the smaller twists, but I was stumped about most of what was actually going on. The mystery and suspense of waiting for this found family to find all the answers was really well done.
Now, the characters. Sadly, this friend group has some issues during this book. They’re at odds because some of them aren’t acting like they’re worried about the problems anymore and they just want to stay and live in normal lives in Unity. But the problems that are in this book are ones that really need to be solved. So, the half of the group that’s working on it is mad at the other half for not making any effort. There’s all sorts of issues and hurtful things are said. It was really hard to see this found family that I loved be so at odds with one another. But I was really happy with the resolution and how they all worked the issues out. There were moments of putting their fights aside for bigger issues, but they also talked about what their fights were really about and I liked that a lot.
Overall, I really enjoyed this book. I think the narrator did a really great job with both of these books. I will definitely listen to more books that have this narrator. I really enjoyed getting to see these characters return to Earth and I thought the plot was interesting. I will absolutely be reading more books by Pohl in the future. This was a diverse story that followed characters that weren’t always easy to love, but had wonderful growth and development.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

#SciFiMonth – Science Fiction That Makes Me Feel Nostalgic

ARTWORK by Tithi Luadthong from 123RF.com.

Hello, lovelies! When thinking about what kinds of things I wanted to talk about for #SciFiMonth, I had an idea to talk about science fiction I read years and years ago that always makes me feel nostalgic when I think about them or reread them. I read quite a bit of dystopian fiction when I was in high school (it’s still one of my favorite genres) and I’ve been slowly rereading some of the older ones to see if they’re still as good as I remember them. So, today I want to talk about those books. The books I read and loved in my younger years that might not be as good as some newer stuff that I’ve read. I thought it would be fun to share some of the books that got me into reading science fiction, and see if anyone else read these in their formative years too.

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld: I loved this series when I was in high school. There’s four books and in the last few years, Westerfeld started a new series that is set in the same world. So, obviously I had to reread the original before starting the new series. I enjoyed the original series mostly because of nostalgia, but objectively there were some elements I didn’t love. It’s one that I will own forever and probably reread again in the future. I don’t think it completely stands, but it’ll always be a favorite in my heart.

Unwind by Neal Shusterman: I remember nothing about this series except the feeling of loving the books. I have the boxed set on my kindle and I’m hoping to reread it before the end of 2020 (maybe not, but definitely in 2021). Shusterman is one of my favorite authors and I’ve loved all his books. So, I’m hoping I still love the Unwind series.

The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey: I loved this series so much the first time I read it when I was in high school. Basically, aliens come and take over the earth. The movie was pretty terrible. I reread the first book a year or two ago and it did not stand up to what I remembered at all. I actually unhauled the series because it wasn’t at all what I remembered. I didn’t get the same nostalgic love that I did while rereading Uglies.

Obsidian by Jennifer L. Armentrout: I have so much love for this book. I reread it last year and only managed to read the first book. I will eventually continue my reread. It’s definitely in the vein of younger YA, but this book is the reason that Antonia and I created Classy x Book Reviews, so it will always hold a place in my heart. Also, there’s a continuation series that follows different characters in the same world.

The Angel Experiment by James Patterson: I got really into Patterson’s books when I was in high school. I read many of his adult mysteries before moving on to his YA books. I loved this series, but the books seemed to get progressively worse because it was supposed to end several times and it kept getting ‘just one more book’ to the point where another book was published in 2020. I own the books and want to reread them but I’m worried that it will kill the happy nostalgia that I still have for it.

Legend by Marie Lu: This is another one that I remember loving, but have no memories of what the series is actually about. I have them on ebook and I definitely want to reread them. I’ve enjoyed all of Lu’s book and I think this one will hold up because it’s a very well loved book in the book community.

Among the Hidden by Margaret Peterson Haddix: I think I read this book because of school (maybe even so long ago that it was middle school). I think this was the book that pulled me into dystopian fiction. I absolutely loved this series. In a world where people are only allowed to have two children, the main character starts to suspect that his neighbors have a third child. I want to buy these books for my daughter so I can make her love science fiction as I do. I really want to reread this series again, but like some of the others, I worry it won’t hold up to my imagined love for it.

These are the science fiction books that I read in my formative years. These books are what fostered my love for the genre. This was so fun to think about and figure out which books to include. It also made me realize that I read a lot more fantasy in high school than I thought I did. What books did you read that helped you fall in love with science fiction? I love reading backlist books, so leave me a comment with some recommendations!

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Iron Gold by Pierce Brown

GoodReads Summary:
A decade ago, Darrow was the hero of the revolution he believed would break the chains of the Society. But the Rising has shattered everything: Instead of peace and freedom, it has brought endless war. Now he must risk everything he has fought for on one last desperate mission. Darrow still believes he can save everyone, but can he save himself?
And throughout the worlds, other destinies entwine with Darrow’s to change his fate forever:
A young Red girl flees tragedy in her refugee camp and achieves for herself a new life she could never have imagined.
An ex-soldier broken by grief is forced to steal the most valuable thing in the galaxy—or pay with his life.
And Lysander au Lune, the heir in exile to the sovereign, wanders the stars with his mentor, Cassius, haunted by the loss of the world that Darrow transformed, and dreaming of what will rise from its ashes.
Red Rising was the story of the end of one universe, and Iron Gold is the story of the creation of a new one. Witness the beginning of a stunning new saga of tragedy and triumph from masterly New York Times bestselling author Pierce Brown.
Iron Gold (Red Rising Saga, #4)Review:
I was very thrown by the fact that this book doesn’t just follow Darrow like the first three books. I understand that this was originally a trilogy and I did end up really enjoying the multiple perspectives, but it was really had to get used to. I definitely cared more about some perspectives than others (Lyra is my favorite and I will gladly die for her). This book had all of the same things I loved about the first three books. Pierce’s prose is stunning. The universe is at war ten years after the ending of the last book. So, there was lots of violence and gore that was so well written within the action scenes. But the addition of the other characters gave us a wider view of the goings on in the story, which I ended up really enjoying.
I felt bad for Darrow. He seemed lost. It’s been ten years; he has a son and Mustang is his wife. But he’s a military leader and he hasn’t been home in over a year. His son is becoming a man and Darrow is missing it. He just wants to made the world he lives in a better place, but he basically only made things worse in this book. I’m interested to see where his storyline will go in the next book since he embraced the Reaper persona in the end of Iron Gold.
Lyra reminded me a lot of Darrow from book one which I think is why I loved her so much. Reds have been moved from the mines to a place that really isn’t much better. She witnesses an attack on her community and she and one of her nephews are the only survivors of her family. She deals with so much grief and so much anger. Lyra tries to do what’s best for her nephew and manages to get herself employment with a Gold we know from the previous books. I loved Lyra and felt so bad for her. She’s a lonely girl that’s lost her family. She is just lonely and trying to figure out how to not drown in her grief. After the chaos that she went through I’m excited to see what happens with her next.
I had a really hard time caring about Lysander. I have a feeling he’s going to be involved in another big battle and I just can’t bring myself to care. The kids lucky Sevro and Darrow didn’t kill him, so I don’t think he’s making great choices.
Ephraim’s story was interesting and I totally predicted his relevance to the story pretty early on. I think his is the most complex story. He has reasons for the way he lives but I don’t know that they’re super good ones. They’re understandable reasons, but I hope he works through it and starts making better choices. I think he’s going to, but it’s still unclear if he’s only making these choices to save someone or because he’s starting to want to do the right thing. With the way this book left off for him I’m very eager to continue onto the next book.
Overall, I enjoyed this book despite the fact that it’s different from the first three. I ended up really enjoying the new characters. I was a little sad that the same squads weren’t always involved, but I did grow to care about the new members of the Howlers and Darrow’s crew. I think this series is incredible and I’m so excited to see what’s going to happen next. It’s a high stakes story filled with action, gore, and characters that you have to get invested in. There are new perspectives which means that there are also new narrators. I’m super glad that Darrow’s narrator stayed the same and I absolutely loved the narrator for Lyra, the other two for Lysander and Ephraim were pretty good but Darrow and Lyra are my favorite forever. I’m going to start the next book now because I can’t wait.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Golden Son by Pierce Brown

GoodReads Summary:
As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. And so Darrow sacrifices himself in the name of the greater good for which Eo, his true love and inspiration, laid down her own life. He becomes a Gold, infiltrating their privileged realm so that he can destroy it from within.
A lamb among wolves in a cruel world, Darrow finds friendship, respect, and even love—but also the wrath of powerful rivals. To wage and win the war that will change humankind’s destiny, Darrow must confront the treachery arrayed against him, overcome his all-too-human desire for retribution—and strive not for violent revolt but a hopeful rebirth. Though the road ahead is fraught with danger and deceit, Darrow must choose to follow Eo’s principles of love and justice to free his people.
He must live for more.
Golden Son (Red Rising Saga, #2)Review:
Golden Son was somehow even more wild than Red Rising. I really didn’t think that was possible, but apparently it was. In this book, it’s two years after the end of Red Rising. Darrow has started working for the man that killed his wife. He’s been sent to the Academy which seems to me like a more relevant version of the Institute. I don’t want to get too much into the plot (and that will probably continue in my reviews for the rest of the series).
Darrow is such an interesting character. He’s born a Red but was carved into a Gold and thrown into their world. He’s still the boy that grew up in the mines, but he’s also now a man that has killed. He’s a Red that’s been turned into a leader. He isn’t with his loyal friends that he made during his time at the Institute at the start of the book, but they do eventually all come together. I didn’t love the start of the book because it felt like I’d missed a bunch of time because I had. There was more than a year of time that we just didn’t get to see. We do get a few memories of that time, but I was confused at first.
I didn’t really start loving this book until the crew got back together. I missed Darrow being with Mustang and Severo and all of the friends. Darrow is completely in his element when he has his friends. I liked that he was still thinking about how it would be hard to do what he was sent to do when that meant betraying the people that were loyal to him.
I really loved that we got to know more about the Sons of Ares. I didn’t like the first meeting with them in this book because who and what we saw wasn’t what the Sons of Ares were supposed to be about. So, when we see other members that we already know, it was exactly what I wanted it to be. I love the plot twists that involved the Sons of Ares because I totally didn’t see them coming. And the ending was absolutely devastating.
Overall, this book was just as violent and gory as the first book. It was excellent. I loved Darrow. I loved getting to see another planet in this universe. I liked the politics. This was a very political story and I really enjoyed that. I love all the characters and their relationships. I liked how thoughtful Darrow was about the things he was doing. I can’t wait to continue the series. I do want to say that I listened to the audiobook for this book and the narrator was incredible. I will absolutely be continuing the rest of the series on audio because I loved the narrator so much.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

#SciFiMonth: Amanda’s Entire SciFi TBR

ARTWORK by Tithi Luadthong from 123RF.com.

Hey, lovelies! I mentioned in my TBR post (here) that at some point this month I was going to share a list of all the science fiction I own and haven’t read yet. Today’s post will be that list. These are all of the books that I own, both physical copies and ebooks), that are on my TBR.

Sky Without Stars by Jessica Brody & Joanne Rendell

Their Fractured Light by Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner

War Girls by Tochi Onyebuchi

Adaptation by Malinda Lo

Inheritance by Malinda Lo

Heart of Iron by Ashley Poston

The City in the Middle of the Night by Charlie Jane Anders

The Power by Naomi Alderman

To Be Taught, If Fortunate by Becky Chambers

The Relentless Moon by Mary Robinette Kowal

The Test by Sylvain Neuvel

To Sleep in a Sea of Stars by Christopher Paolini

The End and Other Beginnings: Stories From the Future by Veronica Roth

Skyward, Vol. 1: My Low-G Life by Joe Henderson, Lee Garbett, & Antonio Fabela

Skyward, Vol. 2: Here There Be Dragonflies by Joe Henderson, Lee Garbett, & Antonio Fabela

Skyward, Vol. 3: Fix the World by Joe Henderson, Lee Garbett, & Antonio Fabela

Paper Girls, Vol. 1 by Brian K. Vaughn, Cliff Chiang, Matthew Wilson, & Jared K. Fletcher

Paper Girls, Vol. 2 by Brian K. Vaughn, Cliff Chiang, Matthew Wilson, & Jared K. Fletcher

So, this is my list. I’m pretty happy with it. But I’m also always looking for new recommendations, so leave your favorites in the comments please! I’m pretty new to adult science fiction so I’m looking for backlist titles I may have missed out on in the last few years. What books are on your TBR?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Amanda’s #SciFiMonth TBR

ARTWORK by Tithi Luadthong from 123RF.com.
QUOTE from Seven Devils by Elizabeth May & Laura Lam

Hello, lovelies and happy November! We’re finally almost out of the shitshow that has been 2020. I discovered in September that #SciFiMonth is a thing that exists and as science fiction is my favorite genre I obviously have to participate. This wonderful event is run by Imyril @ There’s Always Room for One More… and Lisa @ Dear Geek Place. There is an announment post and another post with more details (here) and you can find the #SciFiMonth Twitter here for more details and all the updates. With all of the business out of the way, let’s talk about what I’m hoping to read this month. This is going to be a short list of the books I definitely want to get to before #SciFiMonth is over. Later this month, I will have a full list of all the science fiction books that I own and haven’t read yet so you can all shame me into reading them. Let’s get into it!

War Girls by Tochi Onyebuchi

Heart of Iron by Ashley Poston

Adaptation by Malinda Lo

The Relentless Moon by Mary Robinette Kowal

To Sleep in a Sea of Stars by Christopher Paolini

These five books are my highest priority of all the science fiction I own. There are definitely some I plan to reread as well this month, but that will be a different list. What books are you hoping to read this month?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.