The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware

GoodReads Summary:
When she stumbles across the ad, she’s looking for something else completely. But it seems like too good an opportunity to miss—a live-in nannying post, with a staggeringly generous salary. And when Rowan Caine arrives at Heatherbrae House, she is smitten—by the luxurious “smart” home fitted out with all modern conveniences, by the beautiful Scottish Highlands, and by this picture-perfect family.
What she doesn’t know is that she’s stepping into a nightmare—one that will end with a child dead and herself in prison awaiting trial for murder.
Writing to her lawyer from prison, she struggles to explain the unravelling events that led to her incarceration. It wasn’t just the constant surveillance from the cameras installed around the house, or the malfunctioning technology that woke the household with booming music, or turned the lights off at the worst possible time. It wasn’t just the girls, who turned out to be a far cry from the immaculately behaved model children she met at her interview. It wasn’t even the way she was left alone for weeks at a time, with no adults around apart from the enigmatic handyman, Jack Grant.
It was everything.
She knows she’s made mistakes. She admits that she lied to obtain the post, and that her behavior toward the children wasn’t always ideal. She’s not innocent, by any means. But, she maintains, she’s not guilty—at least not of murder. Which means someone else is.
The Turn of the KeyReview:
The Turn of the Key was the book that my Bookclub chose for our current read. There’s just a few of us that meet once a month or so, and each month one of us picks the next book that we read together. It’s always a good time.
This book was a wild ride. I always forget how much I like mystery/thrillers until I’m actually reading them. I really liked the format this story was told in, up until the end. We follow Rowan as she takes a new nannying job. We get this story in the form of letters that Rowan has written to a lawyer asking for them to take on her case. She writes them from prison. She’s accused of being responsible for the death of one of the children she was in charge of.
I honestly don’t have all that much to say about this. The twists and turns were wild. Some I saw coming and others I totally did not. There were some paranormal aspects introduced that were definitely a little creepy. The story was gripping and I was eager to know what was going to happen next. It felt fast-paced, but that might have just been the short chapters.
I liked this except for the ending. There really was no resolution. We do get details about what actually happened in the form of a letter written by someone else. But I really didn’t like the ending. Had we gotten more of a resolution or any sort of answers I would have liked this way better.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Lying Game by Ruth Ware

Summary:
From the instant New York Times bestselling author of blockbuster thrillers In a Dark, Dark Wood and The Woman in Cabin 10 comes Ruth Ware’s chilling new novel.
On a cool June morning, a woman is walking her dog in the idyllic coastal village of Salten along a tidal estuary known as the Reach. Before she can stop him, the dog charges into the water to retrieve what first appears to be a wayward stick, but to her horror, turns out to be something much more sinister…
The next morning, three women in and around London—Fatima, Thea, and Isabel—receive the text they had always hoped would NEVER come, from the fourth in their formerly inseparable clique, Kate, that says only, “I need you.”
The four girls were best friends at Salten, a second-rate boarding school set near the cliffs of the English Channel. Each different in their own way, the four became inseparable and were notorious for playing the Lying Game, telling lies at every turn to both fellow boarders and faculty, with varying states of serious and flippant nature that were disturbing enough to ensure that everyone steered clear of them. The myriad and complicated rules of the game are strict: no lying to each other—ever. Bail on the lie when it becomes clear it is about to be found out. But their little game had consequences, and the girls were all expelled in their final year of school under mysterious circumstances surrounding the death of the school’s eccentric art teacher, Ambrose (who also happens to be Kate’s father).
Atmospheric, twisty, and with just the right amount of chill that will keep you wrong-footed—which has now become Ruth Ware’s signature style—The Lying Game is sure to be her next big bestseller. Another unputdownable thriller from the Agatha Christie of our time.
the lying game, ruth ware
Review:
I was given this book by my sister in law because she read it recently and enjoyed it. So when we went to visit home last weekend she let me borrow it. I was super excited to read it because the summary sounds pretty good, but also because my SIL and I have similar (for the most part) reading tastes. I like to stay up to date with what she’s reading because she’ll give me good suggestions like this one.
The Lying Game by Ruth Ware is what I just finished. I mostly got what I was expecting from this book. With every page I read, I got some unexpected plot twists, some well-placed suspense, and characters that I could relate to. I liked the way this story was written. There were well-written descriptions that allowed me to picture the setting in my head as well as nice attention to detail. There were little things that were pointed out, little details that added that extra bit to the story. There was an abundance of suspenseful moments throughout this book. Suspense done the right way with enough tidbits of information to keep the reader wanting more, but not so little that we’re left with a huge amount of confusion and questions.
The characters that make this story were another thing I enjoyed very much. They were very realistic characters. When things blew up, their reactions and emotions and thoughts were real and relatable. This book focuses on four friends, Isa (whose point of view tells the story), Kate, Thea, and Fatima. These women became friends in school and have been best friends ever since, even if they didn’t always make time to see or talk to one another. The ladies have the kind of friendship that every girl hopes to make once they’re going into high school or college. They’re forever friends. One says jump and the others say when and how high. I really loved the dynamic between these four for most of the book. Toward the end, things got a bit screwy and they all fell apart for a bit, only to come back together again.
I want to mention a few things about our main character, Isa. She’s a new mother with a baby that’s only about six months old. As I’m currently seven months pregnant and expecting a baby I found myself really relating to her with many things that I can see myself going through in the near future. Along with the motherhood aspect, she’s also dealing with an immense amount of stress and drama from her friends. She finds herself taking it out on her partner, Owen. This is something that’s also super relatable and realistic because most relationships take the brunt of stress from both parties. I know this is something that happens in my relationship for sure. I lean on (mostly annoy and badger and take things out on) my husband when I’m feeling super stressed and he does the same with me. Though neither of us has dealt with the crazy things that Isa deals with during this story, it just makes her more of a real character that I could empathize with and understand more.
Overall, I loved this book. It was a fun quick and crazy thriller that I enjoyed. I loved the fast-paced story with crazy twists and turns that I didn’t see coming. I especially loved the character that I got to know and love. The Lying Game is definitely an adult novel, one that I’d recommend to anyone that loves a good thriller. So if that’s you, go to the store or library and check Ruth Ware’s book out.
Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.