Amanda’s Poetry Collection

Hi, lovelies! I’ve been feeling guilty about all the poetry collections I own and haven’t read anything from yet. My friend, Ari, has gifted me quite a few of these. I love poetry. I found out that I had an undiscovered love for poetry while I was in college. I had to take some poetry writing and reading courses and I focused a bit on modern poetry, which is when I realized that I had all the wrong ideas about poetry. Knowing more about it, and writing some of my own showed me that it’s a form of writing that I do love. So, I started collecting books of poetry while I was in college.

Recently, I unhauled a few collections that I’d owned for a few years and still had yet to pick up even once. I’m trying to get my book collection just to books that I really really love. And that includes the poetry I own. So, I’m hoping to read a few of these before the end of 2021, maybe half of them if I include the ones I’ve started and not finished. I think that’s pretty realistic for me. So, I’m going to list all the titles and authors below and share whether I’ve read them or not.

Selected Poems by Robert Frost
I love Robert Frost. Fire and Ice is one of my all time favorite poems.

Wild Embers by Nikita Gil
I haven’t read this one, but I can’t wait to give it a try. I’ve loved Gil’s other works.

Fierce Fairytales by Nikita Gil
I’m obsessed with this collection. I’ve read the whole thing.

Great Goddesses by Nikita Gil
I’ve read a few poems in this one, but not the whole book.

I Would Leave Me If I Could by Halsey
This is my newest purchase. I love Halsey’s music, so I’m excited to read this one.

Shame is an Ocean I Swim Across by Mary Lambert
I used this one for one of my college classes. I’ve reread quite a few of the poems in this one and they’re all really hard hitting.

Women Are Some Kind of Magic trilogy by Amanda Lovelace
I’m grouping all three of these together. I’ve read the first two in this series and have started the third. I might reread a few of the poems from the first two before try the third to see if I still like them.

To Make Monsters Out of Girls by Amanda Lovelace
I made it about half way through this one and then put it down for some reason.

Shine Your Icy Crown by Amanda Lovelace
This was a complete impulse buy. I’ve seen mixed reviews on this one.

The Day is Ready for You by Alison Malee
Thanks, Ari, for gifting me this one! I follow this author on instagram and I love their stuff.

American Primitive by Mary Oliver
I’ve heard amazing things about this author.

Felicity by Mary Oliver
Same as above. I bought a few by Oliver. But I have actually read this one.

Blue Horses by Mary Oliver
I’ve read a few poems from this one, but not the whole thing.

Pillow Thoughts & Pillow Thoughts II by Courtney Peppernell
I bought these in the early stages of my poetry collecting. I still have yet to pick them up though…

Ordinary Beast by Nicole Sealey
This is one is my favorite collections. I used this one in my college classes as well and I ended up reading the whole thing.

So, this is the entirety of my poetry collection. I’ve read some completely and others I’ve just read a poem or two f rom. But I’m hoping to read them all soon so I have a smaller collection filled with poems I really love. Do you love poetry? Who are some of your favorite lesser known poets?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Blogtober Day Three: National Poetry Day

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Hi, lovelies! Today is national poetry day. So, I thought I’d share a few of my favorite poems with you all.

“Fire and Ice” by Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

Fire and Ice has been my favorite poem for the longest time. There’s something about it that really just pleases me. Anything about the world ending really is my jam. Along with the rhymes and alliteration. I will adore this poem forever. I (also) hold with those who favor fire.

“A Tale of Two Sisters” by Nikita Gil

In the beginning, there was oblivion.
A vastness, and an abyss compromised
of darkness and nothingness.
…until there were two sisters.

One was made from interconnectedness
of all things, a precipice of stories,
a treasury of all things gone and things to come.
Her name was Cosmos.

The other was made from the tricorn
of darkness, black magic waiting to be born,
inkwells of feral power and rebel thoughts.
Her name was Chaos.

Before they had floated into the abyss,
as all celestial beings were left to do in the end,
their father told them to be a binary system,
to never let go of each other.

He warned them that together they could
build everything, but apart, nothing could exist.
So the two came together and imagined a tapestry
of moving, living stars that inhaled around each other.

They pictured impossible things like planets
that help thousands of different beings
and balls of fire to keep them warm
and whole atmospheres to help them breathe.

And this was how the love of two sisters
wrote the first ever eternal poem into magical
loving existence. A single poem
they christened, “The Uni-verse.’

I found Nikita Gil because of twitter. I am so glad that I did because her poetry is so great. This one, in particular, is just beautiful. I love the language she uses. The story of these sisters is one that has stuck with me.

“Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe

It was many and many a year ago,
In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of Annabel Lee;
And this maiden she lived with no other thought
Than to love and be loved by me.

I was a child and she was a child,
In this kingdom by the sea,
But we loved with a love that was more than love—
I and my Annabel Lee—
With a love that the wingèd seraphs of Heaven
Coveted her and me.

And this was the reason that, long ago,
In this kingdom by the sea,
A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling
My beautiful Annabel Lee;
So that her highborn kinsmen came
And bore her away from me,
To shut her up in a sepulchre
In this kingdom by the sea.

The angels, not half so happy in Heaven,
Went envying her and me—
Yes!—that was the reason (as all men know,
In this kingdom by the sea)
That the wind came out of the cloud by night,
Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee.

But our love it was stronger by far than the love
Of those who were older than we—
Of many far wiser than we—
And neither the angels in Heaven above
Nor the demons down under the sea
Can ever dissever my soul from the soul
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;

For the moon never beams, without bringing me dreams
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And the stars never rise, but I feel the bright eyes
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side
Of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride,
In her sepulchre there by the sea—
In her tomb by the sounding sea.

Of course, I had to include something from the wonderful and horrifying Poe. Annabel Lee has been another poem that’s stuck with me for years. There’s something wistful about it, but also dark. I thought it’d be perfect for a spooky addition for this post.

What are your favorite poems or poets? Leave a comment and let me know!

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

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GoodReads

Love Looks Pretty on You by Lang Leav

GoodReads Summary:
The much anticipated new book by international bestselling author Lang Leav. A breathtakingly beautiful collection of contemporary poetry and prose, offering powerful insights into love, heartbreak, relationships, and self-empowerment.
Filled with wisdom and encouragement, every single page is a testament to the power of words, and the impact they can have on the relationships you build with others. And most importantly, the one you have with yourself.
Lang Leav captures the intricacies of emotions like few others can. It’s no wonder she has been recognized as a major influencer of the modern poetry movement and her writing has inspired a whole new generation of poets to pick up a pen.
Love Looks Pretty on You is truly the must-have book for poetry lovers all over the world.
Review:
I was provided this ARC review copy by the wonderful website that is NetGalley. I recently found Lang Leav’s poetry at the recommendation of a friend and I’m so glad I did.
When I read poetry collections, I like to read a few poems each time I sit down with it. I can’t just read the whole thing in one sitting. I just feel like I don’t get the full effect of the words being shared. With that being said, I read this in three sittings. I just enjoyed the poems so much that I had to force myself to put it down each time I was reading.
Some of my favorites were This Year, Idols, Saltwater, I Know Love, and Why You Fell in Love. They were uniquely written, with ample use of prose. I just felt some of them right in my soul. Some were relatable while others spoke to me on a level I didn’t know I needed.
I definitely recommend this collection to anyone that is a lover of poetry. This collection is full of growth and love and just all of the emotions, done wonderfully.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

milk and honey & the sun and her flowers by Rupi Kaur

Milk and Honey Summary:
milk and honey is a collection of poetry and prose about survival. About the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity.
The book is divided into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose. Deals with a different pain. Heals a different heartache. milk and honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.

The Sun and her Flowers Summary:
From Rupi Kaur, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of milk and honey, comes her long-awaited second collection of poetry. A vibrant and transcendent journey about growth and healing. Ancestry and honoring one’s roots. Expatriation and rising up to find a home within yourself.
Divided into five chapters and illustrated by Kaur, the sun and her flowers is a journey of wilting, falling, rooting, rising, and blooming. A celebration of love in all its forms.
Review:
I am not a bookworm that usually enjoys reading poetry. So this will likely be a short and a little unusual sort of review. I don’t have enough to say about these collections to review them as two separate books, but they’re by the same author so I thought it would be acceptable to review them in one post together.
Like I said above, I don’t usually like poetry so these are not books that I would pick out for myself to read or pay money to own. The only reason I read these two poetry collections was that a fellow bookworm sent me the ebooks for free. Even though poetry isn’t a top choice for me, these two books have gotten enough hype and attention to peak my interest. I read these purely because they were free and I wanted to see what everyone was going crazy over.
All of this being said, I was honestly pleasantly surprised with milk and honey as well as the sun and her flowers. I surprised myself by actually liking them. I read milk and honey so quickly, I just couldn’t get enough. I took a little longer with the sun and her flowers so that I could really give it a chance. I liked these poems way more than I thought I was going to. They were honest and meaningful and really hit all the right emotions to be memorable. They spoke of challenging topics in a way that says it’s okay to talk about these ideas that for some unknown reason have become controversial. These words aren’t what you’d expect when you think of traditional poetry and I think that’s why so many people love them, they’re easy to read and relatable. I think they’re a great example of more modern and contemporary poetry.
While I was surprised by the fact that I did actually like these two poetry collections I don’t want to leave the impression that I’m over the moon about them like many others are. I liked them, I didn’t love them. I don’t generally like poetry at all. But some of the poems in these two collections were a bit simple and more like sentences than poems.
Ultimately, I liked (not loved) these two collections. I didn’t think I was going to like them at all, so that’s great. I would love to hear some opinions from those readers out there that genuinely love poetry. What did you poetry lovers think of these more modern ideas of poetry? Be sure to let me know in the comments!

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

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