The Library of the Dead by T.L. Huchu

Summary:
Sixth Sense meets Stranger Things in T. L. Huchu’s The Library of the Dead, a sharp contemporary fantasy following a precocious and cynical teen as she explores the shadowy magical underside of modern Edinburgh.
When a child goes missing in Edinburgh’s darkest streets, young Ropa investigates. She’ll need to call on Zimbabwean magic as well as her Scottish pragmatism to hunt down clues. But as shadows lengthen, will the hunter become the hunted?
When ghosts talk, she will listen…
Ropa dropped out of school to become a ghostalker. Now she speaks to Edinburgh’s dead, carrying messages to the living. A girl’s gotta earn a living, and it seems harmless enough. Until, that is, the dead whisper that someone’s bewitching children–leaving them husks, empty of joy and life. It’s on Ropa’s patch, so she feels honor-bound to investigate. But what she learns will change her world.
She’ll dice with death (not part of her life plan…), discovering an occult library and a taste for hidden magic. She’ll also experience dark times. For Edinburgh hides a wealth of secrets, and Ropa’s gonna hunt them all down.

Book Cover

Review:
The Library of the Dead is a new fantasy novel that I found from my library. I listened to the audiobook and I thought the narrator did a really great job of telling this story. We follow Ropa while she’s doing her job as a ghoststalker. She lives in Scotland and has taken over for her grandmother talking with ghosts, delivering messages, etc. in exchange for money. But she hears rumors of children going missing, some never coming back and others coming back looking like they’ve aged 50 years. She feels obligated to investigate, but what she finds is so much more than she ever expected.
I really enjoyed this story. I listened to it non-stop for hours because I was so easily pulled into the story. I thought Ropa was a great main character. She’s unique and kept the story moving. I liked that she always stood up for herself, but she also knew when to stand down. She’s determined and never gave up, even when she was in a situation where things seemed dire. I also loved the family dynamics of this story. Ropa’s relationship with her sister and grandmother was so nice to see. Ropa feels like all the pressure is on her to provide for the family, but her grandmother doesn’t want her to feel that way.
I thought the magic was interesting. There were a few different kinds of magics. We see Ropa’s ghoststalking up close and I loved how detailed this magic was. But we also learn about other magic when Ropa finds her way into the Library of the Dead. I loved the friends she made there and I’m eager to see where those relationships will go next. I’m also interested to learn more about the other magic that we see.
The only thing I had trouble with was the world building. I think this is because I’m not very familiar with Scotland’s history, so there were things mentioned that I still don’t know if they actually happened or if this is set in a future Scotland. I’m planning to read some other reviews after I finish writing this to see if there’s anyone else that feels this way. I still really liked the setting; I just personally couldn’t tell if it was current or a dystopian Scotland because of my own lack of knowledge.
Overall, I really enjoyed this book and I’m very excited to see what’s going to happen in the sequel. I loved the magic and all of the characters. There was action with high stakes, but Ropa also learned and grew from these experiences. I will definitely be reading more from this author.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Act Your Age, Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert

Summary:
In Act Your Age, Eve Brown the flightiest Brown sister crashes into the life of an uptight B&B owner and has him falling hard—literally.
Eve Brown is a certified hot mess. No matter how hard she strives to do right, her life always goes horribly wrong—so she’s given up trying. But when her personal brand of chaos ruins an expensive wedding (someone had to liberate those poor doves), her parents draw the line. It’s time for Eve to grow up and prove herself—even though she’s not entirely sure how…
Jacob Wayne is in control. Always. The bed and breakfast owner’s on a mission to dominate the hospitality industry—and he expects nothing less than perfection. So when a purple-haired tornado of a woman turns up out of the blue to interview for his open chef position, he tells her the brutal truth: not a chance in hell. Then she hits him with her car—supposedly by accident. Yeah, right.
Now his arm is broken, his B&B is understaffed, and the dangerously unpredictable Eve is fluttering around, trying to help. Before long, she’s infiltrated his work, his kitchen—and his spare bedroom. Jacob hates everything about it. Or rather, he should. Sunny, chaotic Eve is his natural-born nemesis, but the longer these two enemies spend in close quarters, the more their animosity turns into something else. Like Eve, the heat between them is impossible to ignore—and it’s melting Jacob’s frosty exterior.

Book Cover

Review:
I love the Brown Sisters series. Each one is just so much fun to read and Eve’s story is no different. We follow Eve and Jacob as they try to fight the attraction they’re feeling for one another. But the story starts a bit before that. Eve’s just been confronted by her parents and they’ve basically kicked her out in hopes that it would motivate her to finally find a career path and stick with it. So, when Eve comes across a B&B that is hiring a chef, she whorls in, determined the convince Jacob that she’s perfect for the job. When Jacob doesn’t agree with her, she leaves. Except not quite. She hits Jacob with her car and breaks his arm. This story was just as funny as it was heartwarming. I really loved getting to follow along as Eve and Jacob became ‘just friends’ while both being in denial about their attraction to one another. They had some really great banter. Honestly, their whole relationship was just so heartwarming. Eve was such a kind and understanding character. Jacob is autistic, so he prefers some things to be certain ways. He’s clear with communicating his boundaries and what he needs. Eve never judges him or makes him feel other for that and I really loved this aspect of the story. There’s even a moment when someone in town says something offensive and Eve pulls the ‘I don’t get it’ card to make the jerk explain his hurtful ‘joke.’ I loved that they both learned more about themselves while they were learning about one another.
I really liked the bed and breakfast setting of this story. I think it was the perfect place. Away from the rest of Eve’s world. She’s trying to prove herself and she’s found this safe place to do that. Little did she know that she’d also found love.
Overall, I love this whole series. I still think that Dani’s book is my favorite, but I did really enjoy Eve’s story with Jacob. I will definitely be reading more of Hibbert’s backlist until there’s news about new books from her.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Second First Impressions by Sally Thorne

Summary:
Distraction (n): an extreme agitation of the mind or emotions.
Ruthie Midona has worked the front desk at the Providence Luxury Retirement Villa for six years, dedicating her entire adult life to caring for the Villa’s residents, maintaining the property (with an assist from DIY YouTube tutorials), and guarding the endangered tortoises that live in the Villa’s gardens. Somewhere along the way, she’s forgotten that she’s young and beautiful, and that there’s a world outside of work—until she meets the son of the property developer who just acquired the retirement center.
Teddy Prescott has spent the last few years partying, sleeping in late, tattooing himself when bored, and generally not taking life too seriously—something his father, who dreams of grooming Teddy into his successor, can’t understand. When Teddy needs a place to crash, his father seizes the chance to get him to grow up. He’ll let Teddy stay in one of the on-site cottages at the retirement home, but only if he works to earn his keep. Teddy agrees—he can change a few lightbulbs and clip some hedges, no sweat. But Ruthie has plans for Teddy too.
Her two wealthiest and most eccentric residents have just placed an ad (yet another!) seeking a new personal assistant to torment. The women are ninety-year-old, four-foot-tall menaces, and not one of their assistants has lasted a full week. Offering up Teddy seems like a surefire way to get rid of the tall, handsome, unnerving man who won’t stop getting under her skin.
Ruthie doesn’t count on the fact that in Teddy Prescott, the Biddies may have finally met their match. He’ll pick up Chanel gowns from the dry cleaner and cut Big Macs into bite-sized bits. He’ll do repairs around the property, make the residents laugh, and charm the entire villa. He might even remind Ruthie what it’s like to be young and fun again. But when she finds out Teddy’s father’s only fixing up the retirement home to sell it, putting everything she cares about in jeopardy, she’s left wondering if Teddy’s magic was all just a façade.
Hilarious, warm, and romantic, Sally Thorne’s novel delivers an irrepressibly joyous celebration of love and community for fans of 99% Mine and The Hating Game

Book Cover

Review:
Second First Impressions was everything I want from a romance novel. It made me laugh. It made me swoon. It had side characters that absolutely made the story better. We follow Ruthie who works at the front desk of a retirement village. But her boss is on vacation, so she’s temporarily in charge. While she’s in charge, she has a temp assistant, Melanie. The slow friendship that developed between Ruthie and Melanie was adorable. I really loved the two women forming a relationship. They are such different people, but they end up good friends despite not having much in common. Melanie has decided that she needs to shake Ruthie out from living like one of the residents of the village. She’s in her twenties, not her eighties. So, Melanie gets Ruthie on a method of her own creation to get back into dating. Enter Teddy. Teddy is the son of the CEO that just bought the retirement village. Ruthie has been tasked with giving him a job. So, she has him interview for the two residents that can’t seem to keep an assistant.
This story was a fun one. I loved all the little details, like how Ruthie cares for the turtles. I liked Ruthie. I can really relate to being stuck in a routine and feeling significantly older than I really am. I think while she wasn’t the most exciting character, sometimes even a little unlikable, she was realistic. I liked seeing her come out of her shell and start having some fun.
Teddy was a good love interest. It was clear from the start that he was going to be the romantic interest. I’ve seen others say that he’s too likable. Which I actually can understand a little, but I liked him. The only thing I didn’t really like was that his interest seemed more like he was interested in chasing Ruthie. He did spend time to get to know her, but he inserted himself in her life. He didn’t ask to spend time with her, he just came into her house. He did things like that a lot. Never asked her, just chose to do things. But I did like how he brought Ruthie out of her shell and I could totally see the attraction between them.
Overall, I enjoyed this one. I liked the characters, especially the two old women. I liked that Teddy and Ruthie both had goals that they were working toward. I enjoyed this one and I’m looking forward to reading whatever Thorne comes out with next.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

People We Meet on Vacation by Emily Henry

Summary:
Two best friends. Ten summer trips. One last chance to fall in love.
Poppy and Alex. Alex and Poppy. They have nothing in common. She’s a wild child; he wears khakis. She has insatiable wanderlust; he prefers to stay home with a book. And somehow, ever since a fateful car share home from college many years ago, they are the very best of friends. For most of the year they live far apart—she’s in New York City, and he’s in their small hometown—but every summer, for a decade, they have taken one glorious week of vacation together.
Until two years ago, when they ruined everything. They haven’t spoken since.
Poppy has everything she should want, but she’s stuck in a rut. When someone asks when she was last truly happy, she knows, without a doubt, it was on that ill-fated, final trip with Alex. And so, she decides to convince her best friend to take one more vacation together—lay everything on the table, make it all right. Miraculously, he agrees.
Now she has a week to fix everything. If only she can get around the one big truth that has always stood quietly in the middle of their seemingly perfect relationship. What could possibly go wrong?
From the New York Times bestselling author of Beach Read, a sparkling new novel that will leave you with the warm, hazy afterglow usually reserved for the best vacations.

Book Cover

Review:
People We Meet on Vacation is the story of Alex and Poppy falling in love. The story starts with them as estranged best friends. But as the story progresses, we see flashbacks of past vacations that Alex and Poppy took together. We get to see the whole history of their friendship starting from when they met in college to the present. Poppy is feeling restless, in her job, in her life. She misses Alex, who she hasn’t really talked to in two years. One late night text turns into one last vacation for Poppy and Alex. One last chance for them to finally be honest with one another.
I really enjoyed this story. I loved the way it was written. The flashbacks we’re super well done and really gave excellent back story for both Poppy and Alex. I feel like their romance was really well built up and was definitely one that I could easily root for. I loved getting to see all of the placed that they’d traveled to. And their final vacation, the vacation from hell, was absolutely hilarious.
Overall, I love Henry’s adult novels and I’m very excited to see what she will be writing next. I loved Poppy and Alex. They reminded me a bit of myself and my husband. I think that’s why I enjoyed this book so much. It was a fun, quick, and entertaining read.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

A Chorus Rises by Bethany C. Morrow

Summary:
Teen influencer Naema Bradshaw has it all: she’s famous, privileged, has “the good hair”— and she’s an Eloko, a person who’s gifted with a song that woos anyone who hears it. Everyone loves her — well, until she’s cast as the awful person who exposed Tavia’s secret siren powers.
Now, she’s being dragged by the media. No one understands her side: not her boyfriend, not her friends, nor her Eloko community. But Naema knows the truth and is determined to build herself back up — no matter what.
When a new, flourishing segment of Naema’s online supporters start targeting black girls, however, Naema must discover the true purpose of her magical voice.

Book Cover

Review:
Thanks, NetGalley for this eARC, in return, here is my honest review. I was actually surprised by how much I enjoy this book. But at the same time, I wasn’t surprised because I absolutely loved A Song Below Water (reviewed here). A Chorus Rises is set in the same urban fantasy world, but in this one we follow Naema, who wasn’t a super nice person from Tavia’s perspective in A Song Below Water.
Despite actively disliking Naema for the first third of this book, I ended up really loving her. Our first look at Naema is in A Song Below Water which is from Tavia and Effie’s perspectives. These three girls do not get along at all. I think it’s important to mention that this is totally okay! Naema mentions often that just because they’re all black, doesn’t mean they all have to be best friends. They can want better for one another and still actively dislike each other. And I totally agree with that. You don’t have to be friends or even like someone to wish that they’re not being discriminated against because they’re a magical or black.
But the further we get into this story, the more I couldn’t help but like Naema. She’s genuinely funny. She has a confidence in herself that most people would love to have. But she’s also still growing. This book takes place about a year after the end of A Song Below Water. So, Naema has had some time to heal, emotionally, from being stoned. But Portland doesn’t feel the same to Naema anymore. She takes a break and goes to visit her family for their yearly reunion in the south. It’s here that Naema discovers that there’s more to being an Eloko than just the popularity she has in Portland. I really enjoyed getting to see Naema spend time with family she never sees and getting to know more about her Eloko abilities. I absolutely loved her cousin, Courtney. He’s hilarious and I think he was a great support system for Naema. Their relationship made me think of my cousins that were my best friends while I was growing up.
This story covers some really interesting topics that I didn’t see coming. There’s discussion of how easily online voices can be weaponized to do real harm to real people. I think the spotlight on “keyboard warriors” was an excellent one because what it takes to go from talking about doing something to actually doing it? It isn’t that much and it’s something that I don’t think is discussed enough or taken seriously enough. I liked how the friend group worked together to stop this aspect of the story. We get to see some unlikely allies and some healing. And we also get to see these teenagers be brave and do the right thing.
I would have liked for this book to have been longer. I think there were definitely some things mentioned in the story that didn’t really get explored. I’m thinking specifically of the Professor that was mentioned so many times. But we never actually meet her, even though what she’s researching aligns with what Naema is learning about herself. I would have liked to see more about Naema getting more of a handle on talking with the Ancestors. We do get a scene toward the end where things sort of click for Naema in regards to listening to the Ancestors and they help Naema realize that what she and her friends have done isn’t enough, that there’s still more to be done. But we didn’t get to see anymore after that.
Overall, I really grew to love Naema. She’s fierce and outspoken in the best ways. She’s brave and so smart. She knows that what she says hold weight because of her online following. She knows that even though she’s black, she has privilege that comes with being an Eloko. But she also talks about how being an Eloko doesn’t negate the struggles she faces as a black woman. As a queer, white woman, I could appreciate that aspect of the story. I think Namea’s voice is what made this story so gripping for me. Her internal voice was so thoughtful, even when she was angry or unsure. She’s funny and smart, caring and loyal, snarky and passionate. I really loved her by the end of the book. If you haven’t read A Song Below Water, please go do that. If you have, I think you’ll love A Chorus Rises just as much as the first book.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Amanda’s Top Ten Tuesday – 2021 Anticipated Releases

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each week we talk about our top ten with a different topic provided by Jana. This week’s topic is the ten books I’m anticipating in the second half of 2021.

22 June
My Contrary Mary by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, & Jodi Meadows

29 June
That Weekend by Kara Thomas

27 July
Small Favors by Erin A. Craig

10 August
In the Wild Light by Jeff Zentner

24 August 
Vampires, Hearts, & Other Dead Things by Margie Fuston

14 September 
The Scratch Daughters by Hannah Abigail Clarke

21 September 
The Bronzed Beasts by Roshani Chokshi

21 September 
Into the Dying Light by Katy Rose Pool

2 November 
The Grimrose Girls by Laura Pohl

7 December 
The Coldest Touch by Isabel Sterling

What books are you excited for in the second half of 2021?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Rule of Wolves by Leigh Bardugo

Summary:
The wolves are circling. And Ravka’s time is running out.
The Demon King. As Fjerda’s massive army prepares to invade, Nikolai Lantsov will summon every bit of his ingenuity and charm—and even the monster within—to win this fight. But a dark threat looms that cannot be defeated by a young king’s gift for the impossible.
The Stormwitch. Zoya Nazyalensky has lost too much to war. She saw her mentor die and her worst enemy resurrected, and she refuses to bury another friend. Now duty demands she embrace her powers to become the weapon her country needs. No matter the cost.
The Queen of Mourning. Deep undercover, Nina Zenik risks discovery and death as she wages war on Fjerda from inside its capital. But her desire for revenge may cost her country its chance at freedom and Nina the chance to heal her grieving heart.
King. General. Spy. Together they must find a way to forge a future in the darkness. Or watch a nation fall.

Book Cover

Review:
I’ve been sitting here starting at this blank page trying to figure out what to say about Rule of Wolves. But I honestly don’t know. I don’t know how to put my thoughts about this book into words. But I’m going to try my best. I had a hell of a time getting this book into my possession. I preordered from my local independent bookstore and two weeks later I found out I was moving. Apparently, there’s something wonky about this bookstore shipping to my new house because two of the preorders never made it to me. So, it took me almost two months to finally get this book. I do have to say that my local indie store was amazing throughout all of this. Now, Rule of Wolves was one of my most anticipated releases of 2021 because I absolutely love the Grishverse. I especially love Nikolai and Zoya, so I think this duology are my favorite books in this world. I loved this book. I started it around 7:30pm and couldn’t put it down until I finished it around 2am. So, I read this 600 page book in about 6 hours, it was that good that I legitimately didn’t get off the couch until I was done.
So, we follow Nina, Nikolai, and Zoya as well as a few other characters here and there after the events of King of Scars. We see Nikolai and Zoya working together and sometimes apart, to prepare Ravka for war with the Fjerdans. But there’s more than the politics and planning of a potential war that’s on the horizon. There’s also the issue of the plot twist that was revealed at the end of King of Scars. That twist, which I won’t spoil, plays a pretty big role in this story’s plot. I liked how this aspect of the plot brought out character we’d already met. We get to see Alina and Mal and that made my heart so happy. We get to see all of the crows at different points. We also follow Nina who has been working undercover in Fjerda. She and Hanne have made it to the capital and are living with Hanne’s parents. They’re working together, to get close to the pretender to Ravka’s throne and other important people in the Fjerdian government so that Nina can get as much information as possible to send back to Ravka.
Nikolai’s journey was a compelling one. He’s still working on how to figure out how to rid himself of the monster inside him. But he might just be starting to accept that he will never be rid of the monster. I loved getting his perspective, getting to see things from his point of view was the best. I love that despite all the darkness that Nikolai has faced, he’s still kept his sense of humor, even if it is just an act sometimes. His jokes and humor really bring a bit of light to the darkness in this story. I just love Nikolai with my whole heart.
It’s Zoya’s part of the story that I loved the most though. Zoya is such a fascinating character to me. I really didn’t like her in Shadow and Bone, but I grew to love her by the end of that trilogy. And now, in the Nikolai duology, she’s grown so much, but still has some growing to do. I felt honored to follow along on her emotional journey. She knows her place is as Nikolai’s general, but that doesn’t stop her from wanting more, from having feelings for her king. Zoya does so much in this book and the way that her story ended had me absolutely screaming. I love Zoya so much. She is fiery and fierce, abrasive and blunt, loyal and dedicated. Zoya is so many things that you wouldn’t know from the way she presents herself. But she also grows so much. I just cannot say enough good things about Zoya in this book.
Finally, there’s Nina. I didn’t love Nina’s storyline in the first book. I loved Nina in Six of Crows, but in this duology she’s grieving. But she’s also working undercover for Ravka. She’s ferreting out Fjerdian secrets to send back to Ravka, to help Nikolai. While all of that is going on, she’s trying to save as many Grisha as she can. But she’s also falling in love again. I thought this was an interesting choice for Nina’s storyline, but I could help but really enjoy it. Especially the character that she fell in love with. Nina is the same fiery, funny woman we know from the Six of Crows duology, but she’s faced even more darkness now. So, it was a joy to get to see her fall in love again. I liked Hanne. I really did. I think they’re well suited and I enjoyed watching them scheme and work together.
Overall, I absolutely loved this book. I think this duology is my favorite series in the Grishaverse. I love Nikolai and I love Zoya and I love Nina. I think the writing was excellent. The story gripped me from the first page until the last. I loved all of the twists and the turns. The way that everything came together toward the end of the book felt like absolute perfection. After spending so long reading about these characters, it felt like all the choices made were right and natural for the characters we’ve gotten to know over the last six books. I also was really happy with how the book concluded. I think the conclusion was also absolute perfection. I especially loved that Rule of Wolves was wrapped up nicely, not totally neatly, but nice enough for me. But there was a door left open for more, I’m thinking for the rumored third Six of Crows book, but who knows what else Bardugo might be cooking up for the Grishaverse.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda

The Electric Kingdom by David Arnold

Summary:
When a deadly Fly Flu sweeps the globe, it leaves a shell of the world that once was. Among the survivors are eighteen-year-old Nico and her dog, on a voyage devised by Nico’s father to find a mythical portal; a young artist named Kit, raised in an old abandoned cinema; and the enigmatic Deliverer, who lives Life after Life in an attempt to put the world back together. As swarms of infected Flies roam the earth, these few survivors navigate the woods of post-apocalyptic New England, meeting others along the way, each on their own quest to find life and love in a world gone dark. The Electric Kingdom is a sweeping exploration of art, storytelling, eternal life, and above all, a testament to the notion that even in an exterminated world, one person might find beauty in another.

Book Cover

Review:
The Electric Kingdom was the book for my book club in May. This is a post-apocolyptic pandemic story so I thought it was going to be tough to read at times, but thankfully, the story didn’t go too much into detail about the illness that comes from the Flies. Also, it’s a much more vicious story. There are genetically engineered Flies that swarm and devour anything, and we get to see it a few times. But this story was more about survival than the actual Flies and accompanying sickness. It’s a story of loss and grief, survival and found family.
We get to follow a few different points of view. I will say that I was confused for most of this book. There also wasn’t one moment where all of the pieces finally come together. It’s confusing for a number of reasons. One is that there are jumps in time all over the place. Each point of view often spends time remembering things, so there’s little to no warning that we are reading about the past. While these flashbacks did share meaningful information, they were a bit confusing at times. But they did add to the overall story, they just took some getting used to. We are also missing a lot of pieces in the beginning of the story. I spent a lot of time guessing how everything was connected.
I liked the characters and the overall plot, but I was dissatisfied with the ending. There wasn’t any real resolution, more of just hope for the future. But I don’t like that. I can be satisfied with open ended conclusions, but there wasn’t enough for me to be happy with this one. Now, all of this makes it sound like I didn’t like this book. But that’s not the case. I flew through this book. It was compelling and I couldn’t put it down. There were characters I could easily root for and so many questions that I needed answers to.
Overall, nothing I thought was going to happen or connected in the way I thought it would. The Electric Kingdom kept me guessing right up until the final pages. I had fun reading this even though things got pretty dark at times. The story twists and turns, and ends in a way that I never would have guessed. I really enjoyed it and my only big complaint would be the unsatisfying ending.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Amanda’s May Book Haul

Hey, lovelies! May was an unreasonably large haul for me, especially considering that I’m still supposed to be on a book buying ban. But! In my defense, much of these books were gifts. My in-laws came to visit, now that we’re all vaccinated, and they really spoiled me while they were here. I also went a bit overboard with buying books I haven’t read yet. I’ve curbed my buying a bit by limiting myself to books I’ve read and loved, but don’t own yet. So, that didn’t really happen this month. I did buy some books I’ve already read, but I bought or was gifted more that I haven’t read. I will link my reviews for those that I’ve read and reviewed. And then my little to no reasonable rational for why I bought the ones I haven’t read. Let’s get into it!

Books I’ve Already Read

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

The Lives of Saints by Leigh Bardugo

Honey Girl by Morgan Rogers

Rule of Wolves by Leigh Bardugo

Beartown by Fredrik Backman

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones

People We Meet on Vacation by Emily Henry

Act Your Age, Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert

New Books on my Owned TBR

Accidentally Engaged by Farah Heron

The Ones We’re Meant to Find by Joan He
This was another preorder because I wanted to support the donations that the author was running with the preorder incentive.

Dial A For Aunties by Jesse Q. Sutanto
Thank you to my in-laws for this one. It was an impulse target pick.

Take Me Home Tonight by Morgan Matson
Another gift from my husband’s amazing parents, that I impulsively picked.

Realm Breaker by Victoria Aveyard
My final impulse pick/gift from my in-laws. I’ve heard mixed reviews about this one. But I could say the same about Red Queen and I really liked those books.

I Would Leave Me If I Could: A Collection of Poetry by Halsey
I barely read poetry so I have no excuse for this other than I have a small infatuation with Halsey.

Share Your Icy Crown by Amanda Lovelace
Seriously, why did I buy this? I have four other collections by Lovelace and I’ve read maybe two of them.

Anxious People by Fredrik Backman
This one is legitimate because this is my June book club book with my local ladies.

Tools of Engagement by Tessa Bailey
Last month, I bought some of Bailey’s other books and this was the only one I was missing.

Hollowpox: The Hunt for Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
I love this series and I’ve been meaning to buy this newest installment since it came out.

Written in my Own Heart’s Blood by Diana Gabaldon
I didn’t even know this exisisted. I thought I owned all all published books (just the books though, not the novellas) in this series. But now I do, just in time for the release of the final book later this year.

These are the books that I bought or were gifted to me in May. Quite a few of them are on my TBR list for June. So, I’m hopeful that I’ll be able to add many of these to my ‘read’ list pretty quickly. Did you buy any books in May? Are any of these books you’ve read or want to read? Let me know!

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Legacy by Nora Roberts

Summary:
Adrian Rizzo was seven when she met her father for the first time. That was the day he nearly killed her—before her mother, Lina, stepped in.
Soon after, Adrian was dropped off at her grandparents’ house in Maryland, where she spent a long summer drinking lemonade, playing with dogs, making a new best friend—and developing the stirrings of a crush on her friend’s ten-year-old brother. Lina, meanwhile, traveled the country promoting her fitness brand and turning it into a billion-dollar business. There was no point in dwelling on the past.
A decade later, Adrian has created her own line of yoga and workout videos, following in Lina’s footsteps but intent on maintaining creative control. And she’s just as cool-headed and ambitious as her mother. They aren’t close, but they’re cordial—as long as neither crosses the other.
But while Lina dismisses the death threats that Adrian starts getting as a routine part of her daughter’s growing celebrity, Adrian can’t help but find the vicious rhymes unsettling. Year after year, they keep arriving—the postmarks changing, but the menacing tone the same. They continue after she returns to Maryland and becomes reacquainted with Raylan, her childhood crush, all grown up and as gorgeously green-eyed as ever. Sometimes it even seems like the terrifying messages are indeed routine, like nothing will come of them. Until the murders start, and the escalation begins… 

Legacy

Review:
Thank you NetGalley and publishers for an eARC of Legacy in exchange for an honest review.
This story follows Adrian, who is a fitness/lifestyle influencer. When she was a child, her father showed up to her house and tried to kill her and her mother. He was the one that died instead. This is where the story starts. We follow Adrian as she grows into an adult and eventually come to present day where she’s working from her grandparents’ home and running a successful company that’s under the umbrella of her mother’s fitness company.
Roberts is a comfort author of mine. I think that’s because her stories lean toward predictable and are a bit formulaic. I found myself being reminded of her past books while reading Legacy with the way certain characters speak and just the overall way the story is told. I don’t want this to be taken as a negative thing because Roberts is a comfort author for me, so sometimes I just need those books where I know everything will be okay and there will be lovable characters along the way.
The characters are really what stand out in this book. I don’t know that I actually like Adrian, but she was so well developed and we got to see that development happen so it was hard not to be invested in her story. But there were many great characters. We follow them for such a long period of time, that it’s hard not to care for them. But because we started the story so early in Adrian’s life, the ending felt a bit rushed. The romantic relationship didn’t feel like there was enough time to be as in love as they were.
Overall, I enjoyed this book while I was reading it. The story was well written and interesting. The characters were well developed and lovable. But the plot felt a bit missing. I will always love Roberts books. But this one just fell a bit flat for me.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Amanda’s 2021 Anticipated Series Finales

Hey, lovelies! Last month, I made a post where I recommended series that were completely published for all your binge reading desires. But it got me thinking about what series I love that will be completed soon. So, I have a list for you today of books that are series finales being published in 2021. These are some of my most anticipated releases of 2021.

All the Tides of Fate (All the Stars and Teeth, #2)

All the Tides of Fate by Adalyn Grace
Publication Date: February 2, 2021
My review for All the Stars and Teeth
“Through blood and sacrifice, Amora Montara has conquered a rebellion and taken her rightful place as queen of Visidia. Now, with the islands in turmoil and the people questioning her authority, Amora cannot allow anyone to see her weaknesses. No one can know about the curse in her bloodline. No one can know that she’s lost her magic. No one can know the truth about the boy who holds the missing half of her soul. To save herself and Visidia, Amora embarks on a desperate quest for a mythical artifact that could fix everything―but it comes at a terrible cost. As she tries to balance her loyalty to her people, her crew, and the desires of her heart, Amora will soon discover that the power to rule might destroy her.”

Act Your Age, Eve Brown (The Brown Sisters, #3)

Act Your Age, Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert
Publication Date: March 9, 2021
My review for Get a Life, Chloe Brown & Take a Hint, Dani Brown
“Eve Brown is a certified hot mess. No matter how hard she strives to do right, her life always goes horribly wrong—so she’s given up trying. But when her personal brand of chaos ruins an expensive wedding (someone had to liberate those poor doves), her parents draw the line. It’s time for Eve to grow up and prove herself—even though she’s not entirely sure how… Jacob Wayne is in control. Always. The bed and breakfast owner’s on a mission to dominate the hospitality industry—and he expects nothing less than perfection. So when a purple-haired tornado of a woman turns up out of the blue to interview for his open chef position, he tells her the brutal truth: not a chance in hell. Then she hits him with her car—supposedly by accident. Yeah, right. Now his arm is broken, his B&B is understaffed, and the dangerously unpredictable Eve is fluttering around, trying to help. Before long, she’s infiltrated his work, his kitchen—and his spare bedroom. Jacob hates everything about it. Or rather, he should. Sunny, chaotic Eve is his natural-born nemesis, but the longer these two enemies spend in close quarters, the more their animosity turns into something else. Like Eve, the heat between them is impossible to ignore—and it’s melting Jacob’s frosty exterior.”

Rule of Wolves (King of Scars, #2)

Rule of Wolves by Leigh Bardugo
Publication Date: March 30, 2021
My review for King of Scars
“The wolves are circling and a young king will face his greatest challenge in the explosive finale of the instant #1 New York Times-bestselling King of Scars Duology.
The Demon King. As Fjerda’s massive army prepares to invade, Nikolai Lantsov will summon every bit of his ingenuity and charm—and even the monster within—to win this fight. But a dark threat looms that cannot be defeated by a young king’s gift for the impossible.
The Stormwitch. Zoya Nazyalensky has lost too much to war. She saw her mentor die and her worst enemy resurrected, and she refuses to bury another friend. Now duty demands she embrace her powers to become the weapon her country needs. No matter the cost.
The Queen of Mourning. Deep undercover, Nina Zenik risks discovery and death as she wages war on Fjerda from inside its capital. But her desire for revenge may cost her country its chance at freedom and Nina the chance to heal her grieving heart.
King. General. Spy. Together they must find a way to forge a future in the darkness. Or watch a nation fall.”

On This Unworthy Scaffold (Shadow Players, #3)

On This Unworthy Scaffold by Heidi Heilig
Publication Date: April 27, 2021
My review for For a Muse of Fire & A Kingdom for a Stage
“Jetta’s home is spiraling into civil war. Le Trépas—the deadly necromancer—has used his blood magic to wrest control of the country, and Jetta has been without treatment for her malheur for weeks. Meanwhile, Jetta’s love interest, brother, and friend are intent on infiltrating the palace to stop the Boy King and find Le Trépas to put an end to the unleashed chaos. The sweeping conclusion to Heidi Heilig’s ambitious trilogy takes us to new continents, introduces us to new gods, flings us into the middle of palace riots and political intrigue, and asks searching questions about power and corruption. As in the first two books, the story is partly told in ephemera, including original songs, myths, play scripts, and various forms of communication.”

Grace and Glory (The Harbinger, #3)

Grace and Glory by Jennifer L. Armentrout
Publication Date: June 1, 2021
My review for Storm and Fury & Rage and Ruin
“Trinity Marrow has lost the battle and her beloved Protector. Even with both demons and Wardens on her side, Trin may not win the war against the Harbinger. Bringing Lucifer back to the world to fight the Harbinger is probably a really, really bad idea, but they’re out of options—and the world’s ultimate fallen angel is the only being powerful enough to impact the outcome. As Trin and Zayne form a new and more dangerous bond and Lucifer unleashes Hell on earth, the apocalypse looms and the world teeters on the end of forever. Win or lose, one thing is certain—nothing will ever be the same.”

Reign (Stormheart, #3)

Reign by Cora Carmack
Publication Date: July 6, 2021
My review of Roar & Rage
“Aurora Pavan wanted to change her world. She wanted to protect her people, not because they paid taxes, but because they deserved to live without fear. She wanted Pavan to be a home that welcomed everyone–remnants, stormhunters, and witches included. For the first time in her life, she did not dread the duty into which she was born. She wanted it. Then she met him. The Stormlord–the man who wielded the same magic as she, but with the intent to destroy rather than save. The Aurora Pavan who came home from that confrontation was not the same girl that had braved the wildlands and joined a rebellion. She was no longer the girl who was ready to change the world, ready to rule. But she’s the queen now all the same. And her kingdom needs her. If only she can keep the new darkness inside her at bay.”

The Bronzed Beasts (The Gilded Wolves, #3)

The Bronzed Beasts by Roshani Chokshi
Publication Date: September 21, 2021
My review for The Gilded Wolves & The Silvered Serpents
“After Séverin’s seeming betrayal, the crew is fractured. Armed with only a handful of hints, Enrique, Laila, Hypnos and Zofia must find their way through the snarled, haunted waterways of Venice, Italy to locate Séverin. Meanwhile, Séverin must balance the deranged whims of the Patriarch of the Fallen House and discover the location of a temple beneath a plague island where the Divine Lyre can be played and all that he desires will come to pass. With only ten days until Laila expires, the crew will face plague pits and deadly masquerades, unearthly songs and the shining steps of a temple whose powers might offer divinity itself…but at a price they may not be willing to pay.”

Into the Dying Light (The Age of Darkness, #3)

Into the Dying Light by Katy Rose Pool
Publication Date: September 21, 2021
My review for There Will Come a Darkness & As the Shadow Rises
“Following the destruction of the City of Mercy, an ancient god has been resurrected and sealed inside Beru’s body. Both are at the mercy of the Prophet Pallas, who wields the god’s powers to subjugate the Six Prophetic Cities. But every day, the god grows stronger, threatening to break free and sow untold destruction. Meanwhile, far away from Pallas Athos, Anton learns to harness his full powers as a Prophet. Armed with the truth about how the original Prophets killed the god, Anton leads Jude, Hassan, and Ephyra on a desperate quest to the edge of the world. With time running out, the group’s tenuous alliance is beset by mounting danger, tumultuous romance, and most of all by a secret that Anton is hiding: a way to destroy the god at the price of an unbearable sacrifice. But the cost of keeping that secret might be their lives—and the lives of everyone in the Six Prophetic Cities.”

Jade Legacy (The Green Bone Saga, #3)

Jade Legacy by Fonda Lee
Publication Date: November 30, 2021
“Jade, the mysterious and magical substance once exclusive to the Green Bone warriors of Kekon, is now known and coveted throughout the world. Everyone wants access to the supernatural abilities it provides, from traditional forces such as governments, mercenaries, and criminal kingpins, to modern players, including doctors, athletes, and movie studios. As the struggle over the control of jade grows ever larger and more deadly, the Kaul family, and the ancient ways of the Kekonese Green Bones, will never be the same. The Kauls have been battered by war and tragedy. They are plagued by resentments and old wounds as their adversaries are on the ascent and their country is riven by dangerous factions and foreign interference that could destroy the Green Bone way of life altogether. As a new generation arises, the clan’s growing empire is in danger of coming apart. The clan must discern allies from enemies, set aside aside bloody rivalries, and make terrible sacrifices… but even the unbreakable bonds of blood and loyalty may not be enough to ensure the survival of the Green Bone clans and the nation they are sworn to protect.”

These are the series finales that I am eagerly awaiting. The Jade Legacy is the only one that might take me a while to read because I haven’t yet read the first two books. But I already know I’m going to love them. What series that are being completed in 2021 are you looking forward to? Any series I should have on my radar?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Project Hail Mary by Andy Weir

Summary:
Ryland Grace is the sole survivor on a desperate, last-chance mission–and if he fails, humanity and the earth itself will perish.
Except that right now, he doesn’t know that. He can’t even remember his own name, let alone the nature of his assignment or how to complete it.
All he knows is that he’s been asleep for a very, very long time. And he’s just been awakened to find himself millions of miles from home, with nothing but two corpses for company.
His crewmates dead, his memories fuzzily returning, he realizes that an impossible task now confronts him. Alone on this tiny ship that’s been cobbled together by every government and space agency on the planet and hurled into the depths of space, it’s up to him to conquer an extinction-level threat to our species.
And thanks to an unexpected ally, he just might have a chance.
Part scientific mystery, part dazzling interstellar journey, Project Hail Mary is a tale of discovery, speculation, and survival to rival The Martian–while taking us to places it never dreamed of going.

Project Hail Mary

Review:
Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for this eARC in exchange for an honest review. I loved Weir’s previous two novels, The Martian and Artemis, so it’s no surprise that I also loved Project Hail Mary.
This story follows Ryland Grace. He’s just woken up with no memory of where he is or what the heck is going on. He quickly realizes that he’s in outer space but doesn’t know why. As he starts to explore the spaceship, he starts to regain his memories. He can’t even remember his own name at first, but somehow has all sort of scientific knowledge. I thought this was a really interesting way to tell the story. I enjoy a good flashback, but only if it’s done well and I think that it was in this story. We learn relevant information alongside Grace and there was a mood of suspense with the reader left wondering exactly how a middle school teacher ended up on a last ditch space mission. Both timelines were compelling. We learn small things about Grace at first. Things like his job, and eventually how he came to be on this space mission. But I think I was more interested in the present timeline. It’s not really a life or death mission. Those sent on the Hail Mary knew the risks.
The science of this story was really interesting. There was definitely a bit that went way over my head, but I liked that the most important bits were summarized in a way that the reader could understand. It was heavy on the science but that didn’t lessen my enjoyment of the story. I managed to follow along even if I didn’t always actually understand it. It’s the problem solving that I think was the most interesting. There are tons of problems that pop up, but Grace (with help from someone I can’t say anything about) managed to figure out solutions.
Overall, I was completely sucked into this story. I stayed up entirely too late because I just couldn’t stop reading. I needed to know how this story was going to end. As for the actual ending, I liked that it had a full circle kind of storyline, but I would have liked to get some more definitive answers about what happened on Earth. I think science fiction fans with absolutely devour this one, just like I did. I honestly want to pick it up and reread it already.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Chain of Iron by Cassandra Clare

Summary:
Cordelia Carstairs seems to have everything she ever wanted. She’s engaged to marry James Herondale, the boy she has loved since childhood. She has a new life in London with her best friend Lucie Herondale and James’s charming companions, the Merry Thieves. She is about to be reunited with her beloved father. And she bears the sword Cortana, a legendary hero’s blade.
But the truth is far grimmer. James and Cordelia’s marriage is a lie, arranged to save Cordelia’s reputation. James is in love with the mysterious Grace Blackthorn whose brother, Jesse, died years ago in a terrible accident. Cortana burns Cordelia’s hand when she touches it, while her father has grown bitter and angry. And a serial murderer is targeting the Shadowhunters of London, killing under cover of darkness, then vanishing without a trace.
Together with the Merry Thieves, Cordelia, James, and Lucie must follow the trail of the knife-wielding killer through the city’s most dangerous streets. All the while, each is keeping a shocking secret: Lucie, that she plans to raise Jesse from the dead; Cordelia, that she has sworn a dangerous oath of loyalty to a mysterious power; and James, that he is being drawn further each night into the dark web of his grandfather, the arch-demon Belial. And that he himself may be the killer they seek.

Chain of Iron (The Last Hours, #2)

Review:
If you don’t already know, Chain of Iron is the second book in The Last Hours trilogy. This is a sort of follow up series to The Infernal Devices. I think what’s interesting about The Last Hours is that I really love this series so far, but I didn’t really care for The Infernal Devices. Anyway, you can find my review for Chain of Gold here.
Chain of Iron begins a few months after the ending of Chain of Gold. I didn’t love this, as I wanted to see James and Cordelia out in Shadowhunter society as an engaged couple, not just after they’re already married. But that was a small thing and didn’t really take away from my enjoyment of the story. I think the overall plot was interesting, but it’s absolutely not what kept me invested in this story. This is a character focused series, much like Clare’s other books, and oh boy, have I fallen in love with these characters.
I talked mostly about why I liked the characters in my review for Chain of Gold, which I linked above, so in this review I don’t want to do that. I think their relationships are so intricate and wonderful. The Merry Thieves are James, Christopher, Thomas, and Matthew. These four are the best of friends, some of them even cousins. I loved that we get to see them all together, but I especially liked seeing when they were one on one. Matthew and James are complicated. They’re parabatai, but Matthew is struggling. It’s very obvious that he drinks too much, but no one knows how to address that without causing problems. So, they just don’t address it. I think Matthew is still my favorite. We learn why he is so unhappy and drinks so much. Clare did a really great job of filling out each character’s development with more backstory for each of them. I love how odd Christopher is considered in the Shadowhunter society and I love that the Merry Thieves accept and love him for exactly who he is. Thomas, my whole heart, has a really interesting plotline that involves romantic relationships and I really loved it. I absolutely ship him and that character. Then there’s Cordelia and Lucie. Lucie, James’s sister, is going to be Cordelia’s parabatai. But Lucie has her own shit going on. I love that Lucie is a writer. It’s believed that Shadowhunters cannot create art, but I adored the bits and pieces of Lucie’s writing that we get to see. I think her plotline is going to take her on a very compelling path and I cannot wait to see where it goes. Cordelia has become such an integral part of this friend group and I loved it. I really liked how easily accepted she was into the Merry Thieves. I liked that it felt like she was friends with everyone too rather than them just humoring her because she’s getting married to James or because she’s Lucie’s friend.
Now, Alistair isn’t painted in a very nice light in this book or in the first book. But I still just really loved him. I think his growth has been nothing short of excellent. I really like how he knows that he’s done hurtful things, but he isn’t asking anyone to forget that. He’s working on his growth and only asking that others see that he’s growing and somehow work to maybe forgive him. His love for his sister, Cordelia, is one of my favorite parts of this story. I love a good sibling relationship and this book is full of that.
I still hate Grace. I think Clare was maybe trying to get readers to sympathize with her, but I just couldn’t.
There are so many other characters and relationships I could mention, but I feel like this review is already super long. So, really quick. I love Anna. I liked Ariadne and I think her part in the story will play out interestingly. I adore that we get to see Magnus and that Jem is such a big part of the story. I still hate Tatiana.
Overall, I have nothing but good things to say about this book. I love the setting, the clothing, the descriptions, but most of all I love these characters with my whole heart. I love how diverse the characters are. We get lots of sexual identity diversity and I love that. Some are gay, some are lesbians, some are bisexual. I appreciate all of it. I’ll have to reread The Dark Artifices, but The Last Hours might become my favorite of the Shadowhunter series.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Gilded Serpent by Danielle L. Jensen

Summary:
THEIR BATTLES ENDED IN VICTORY
Lydia returns to Mudaire to enter training at the healing temple. But instead of fighting to save lives, she’s convinced she is doing more harm than good. She delves into the history of the gods only to discover a truth that will change her life forever.
His birthright as commander of the Royal Army is finally in his grasp, but Killian feels anything but victorious. Burdened by his past, he embraces the darker side of his mark—and in doing so, risks starting a war.
BUT THE WAR HAS ONLY JUST BEGUN
Having defeated the tyrant Urcon, Marcus struggles to form a lasting alliance with the Arinoquians. But he is plagued by the knowledge that there is a traitor among his friends, and it could cost him everything that he’s fought for.
Torn between her growing allegiance to the Thirty-Seventh legion and her need to liberate her people, Teriana finds herself mired in a web of secrets. She embarks upon a path that will either save everyone she loves—or put them all in their graves.

Gilded Serpent (Dark Shores, #3)

Review:
Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for providing me with an eARC of Gilded Serpents in exchange for complete honesty about how much this book destroyed me. I reread both book one and book two via the audiobooks (which were really great and I recommend them!!) so the world and characters were fresh in my mind when I started this book.
Jensen somehow managed to give me all of the things to make my heart happier than it’s ever been for these characters and yet still rip it still beating right out of my chest. In Gilded Serpents, the four characters that we’ve come to love so very much in the first two books, Teriana, Marcus, Lydia, and Killian, all have their own points of view. And much like how book one and book two paralleled one another with their timelines, book three does that as well. But one of the most interesting things that I noticed was how the events of Marcus and Teriana’s journey paralleled events of Killian and Lydia’s journey. There were times during the story that both pairs were doing the same or similar things, like staying at an inn for example, and I thought that was such a fun aspect of the story. I just want these four to finally all meet up so badly I could scream. I also want to say, there’s a secret that’s finally revealed in this book that I’ve been suspecting since reading Lydia’s book (Dark Skies) and I’m not surprised that I was right but I was happy to have it confirmed. I also really loved that the characters are finally learning things. While Lydia learned where Teriana was in Dark Skies, Teriana has no idea that everyone thinks Lydia dead. So, secrets are revealed in this one and they are juicy.
Now, all four of these characters have grown immensely throughout their journeys so far. Lydia, while no expert swordswoman, has learned to defend herself. She’s also learned an incredible amount about her magic. She’s smart and determined, clever and stubborn, fierce and passionate. I love her so much. She’s grown so much from the timid patrician girl we knew in Dark Shores.
Teriana’s story is filled with inner conflict. She’s in love with her enemy and that has some obvious challenges. She’s done nothing but make hard choices since this series started and that doesn’t change in this book. She’s faced with more hard choices, but I was delighted to see her find some moments of happiness. I think what I love most about Teriana is that she always stays positive. Even when she’s carrying another human being to what could likely be her death. She suffers and struggles, but doesn’t let those challenges win.
Marcus is a tough character for me. I go back and forth between loving him and really disliking him (much like Teriana). He is the Legatus of the 37th legion. But these men are more than just his subordinates, they’re his family. Marcus also faces many challenges in this book. He must make hard choices regarding his men. He’s put in situations where he has to face his fears and others where his internal battle of what’s right versus what’s being ordered. I think I ultimately will love him. But I’ll still probably flip flop back and forth again during the next book.
Killian is my favorite. He’s a Marked warrior, so he’s strong, fast, skilled, and very smart when it comes to battle. But he faces a struggle of heart versus duty. (There is another parallel!) With Killian it’s different though because, as the reader, I know a secret that will change everything. Though once that secret is out, we didn’t get to see much after that. Killian’s dark path isn’t over yet, but he will forever fight to keep his loved ones and his kingdom safe. He’s loyal and full of love, compassionate and intelligent. He’s absolutely someone you’d want on your side.
Overall, I loved this book just as much as the first two. It was nice not to have to wonder as much about what was happening to the other couple because we were getting all of their points of view. I really liked that the chapters are short and still left me wanting more from each character. I also have to mention the world. We see three places, four if you include the ocean, in the first two books. But in this one, we find out more about other kingdoms and we get to see the mysterious Darin. We also get to see more Marked Ones that are marked by different Gods. I love the magic in this series and it was really interesting getting to see more of the abilities bestowed from other Gods. The only thing I didn’t like was the cliff hanger and that’s only because there isn’t even a cover for book four yet. I face the eternal bookworm struggle of suffering to wait for the next book in the series. I cannot recommend this series enough. It’s full of diverse character that you just can’t help falling in love with.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

To Love and to Loathe by Martha Waters

Summary:
The widowed Diana, Lady Templeton and Jeremy, Marquess of Willingham are infamous among English high society as much for their sharp-tongued bickering as their flirtation. One evening, an argument at a ball turns into a serious wager: Jeremy will marry within the year or Diana will forfeit one hundred pounds. So shortly after, just before a fortnight-long house party at Elderwild, Jeremy’s country estate, Diana is shocked when Jeremy appears at her home with a very different kind of proposition.
After his latest mistress unfavorably criticized his skills in the bedroom, Jeremy is looking for reassurance, so he has gone to the only woman he trusts to be totally truthful. He suggests that they embark on a brief affair while at the house party—Jeremy can receive an honest critique of his bedroom skills and widowed Diana can use the gossip to signal to other gentlemen that she is interested in taking a lover.
Diana thinks taking him up on his counter-proposal can only help her win her wager. With her in the bedroom and Jeremy’s marriage-minded grandmother, the formidable Dowager Marchioness of Willingham, helping to find suitable matches among the eligible ladies at Elderwild, Diana is confident her victory is assured. But while they’re focused on winning wagers, they stand to lose their own hearts.

To Love and to Loathe (The Regency Vows, #2)

Review:
Thank you NetGalley and publishers for this eARC in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed Waters’ debut novel, To Have and to Hoax. So, I was excited when I was approved for an arc of To Love and to Loathe.
This is an enemies to lovers, friends with benefits story. Diana and Jeremy aren’t really enemies, but they definitely don’t get along. When together, which happens often as Jeremy is good friends with Diana’s brother, all they do is argue. Neither of them can let the other have the last word and they both always need to be right. The banter and arguing (read: flirting!) was the best part of this book. Diana is witty and quick with her rebuttals. I really enjoyed their debates. They were always filled with sexual tension that’s obvious to the reader, but not the characters. I think both Jeremy and Diana were well fleshed out characters. Both had backstories that fit well with why they are the way they are. Their growth felt organic and not at all forced. I just genuinely liked their relationship.
I also want to mention that I really loved Diana’s friends. We know them from Waters’ previous novel. But I liked getting to see Violet and Audley, getting caught flushed and sweaty. I also liked seeing more of Emily and learning a bit more about her romantic prospects.
Overall, I enjoyed this one. I liked all the characters. The setting felt like a traditional historical romance, not that there’s anything wrong with that. But it felt familiar. It felt like something I’d read before because there’s only so much that can be unique when it comes to these kinds of romances. I don’t think that lessened my enjoyment of the story because the characters were so entertaining and likeable. I will absolutely recommend this one for historical romance fans.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.