The Blade Between by Sam J. Miller

Summary:
Ronan Szepessy promised himself he’d never return to Hudson. The sleepy upstate town was no place for a restless gay photographer. But his father is ill and New York City’s distractions have become too much for him. He hopes that a quick visit will help him recharge.
Ronan reconnects with two friends from high school: Dom, his first love, and Dom’s wife, Attalah. The three former misfits mourn what their town has become—overrun by gentrifiers and corporate interests. With friends and neighbors getting evicted en masse and a mayoral election coming up, Ronan and Attalah craft a plan to rattle the newcomers and expose their true motives. But in doing so, they unleash something far more mysterious and uncontainable.
Review:
Hudson has a rich, proud history and, it turns out, the real estate developers aren’t the only forces threatening its well-being: the spirits undergirding this once-thriving industrial town are enraged. Ronan’s hijinks have overlapped with a bubbling up of hate and violence among friends and neighbors, and everything is spiraling out of control. Ronan must summon the very best of himself to shed his own demons and save the city he once loathed.
The Blade BetweenReview:
Thank you, NetGalley and the publishers for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review. I requested The Blade Between because a friend of mine was absolutely raving about it. I’m glad that I requested it because I flew through this book. I don’t know that I would say I enjoyed it, but it was definitely an experience.
So, I want to mention first that the writing was incredible. There were so many great lines and fantastic descriptions in this book. I cannot say enough good things about Miller’s writing. He managed to make it a creepy and atmospheric story, but also convinced us to love these very flawed characters. I think there were some really interesting topics covered in a thoughtful way. This story follows Ronan as he returns to his home town of Hudson, a place he has no fond memories of. But his father is dying and it’s time he finally returns. But things escalate and suddenly he’s fighting against the gentrification of a town he grew up hating. I really liked this aspect of the story. Ronan has so many mixed feelings about his hometown, but he still does his damnedest to save it. I also loved all of the antics that Ronan and his friends participate in to ‘save’ the town. I think there were definitely some moments that were a bit extreme, but the author did a really good job showing character motivations that were almost understandable. It wasn’t hard to sympathize with these characters.
I also think the author did a really great job of creating different and interesting characters. Even though the story sort of jumped around with who it was following, I had no issues distinguishing between any of them. They were all unique and interesting. Now, the plot was fascinating. I loved the fantasy elements that were included in the story. The bits about the whales was absolutely creepy but only got creepier with the inclusion of the ghosts that play a role in the story.
Overall, I think this was a horrifying and excellent story. I will absolutely be reading more books by this author. Miller’s writing was exceptional and memorable. I think the characters were easy to love, even when they were doing shitty things. I just couldn’t put this book down. I highly recommend this one for fans of horror or darker fantasy books.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Iron Raven by Julie Kagawa

Summary:
Robin Goodfellow. Puck. Prankster, joker, raven, fool… King Oberon’s right-hand jester from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The legends are many, but the truth will now be known as never before, as Puck finally tells his own story and faces a threat to the lands of Faery and the human world unlike any before.
With the Iron Queen Meghan Chase and her prince consort, Puck’s longtime rival Ash, and allies old and new by his side, Puck begins a fantastical and dangerous adventure not to be missed or forgotten.
Review:The Iron Raven (The Iron Fey: Evenfall, #1)
The Iron Raven
is the first book in the new spin-off series, The Iron Fey: Evenfall. I am part of the blog tour hosted by the publisher (InkYard Press) so I received this eARC through NetGalley and the publishers in exchange for promotion and an honest review. Now, onto the review.
The Iron Raven is like jumping right back into the world of the Iron Fey that I know and love (I reread all the previous books in anticipation for this one). Kagawa continues with her ability to provide vivid imagery and a stunning world. I love that with each new Iron Fey story, we get to see familiar creatures, but there are also new creatures that are fascinating. I just genuinely love all of the myths that Kagawa has managed to add to this book (and series). I’m very intrigued to see where this story is going and what the secrets behind the Big Bad are.
Puck, also known as Robin Goodfellow, is the main character for this book (and I assume the Evenfall series). I was really excited for Puck to finally have his own series. He’s always been one of my favorites. His storyline is interesting. We get to see the Puck we know and love, but we also get to see the Puck of legends, the Robin Goodfellow whose pranks bordered on cruel. Puck has an inner struggle in this story that was very compelling. I’m definitely interested to see how the rest of this series will play out.
We get to see new characters, like my favorite Nyx, and some old ones as well. We see Kierran, Meghan, and Ash, as well as some other minor characters. I really liked Nyx. I’m dying to know more about her past. I think it was really interesting to have someone that doesn’t know any of the stories about Puck. I liked the bits with Kierran and I did enjoy seeing the whole gang together again, but I sort of wish that it has less of the characters we already knew (aside from Puck of course). I wouldn’t say that I disliked the whole squad being back, but I think I would have enjoyed it more if this had been a new adventure that didn’t need Meghan to come to save the day.
Overall, I still really enjoy this. I’m mostly a fan of authors coming back to their old series and continuing them. Kagawa’s writing is still excellent. With vivid world-building, fascinating creatures and mythology, and characters I already loved, I think many people will love this book.
Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Fable by Adrienne Young

GoodReads Summary:
For seventeen-year-old Fable, the daughter of the most powerful trader in the Narrows, the sea is the only home she has ever known. It’s been four years since the night she watched her mother drown during an unforgiving storm. The next day her father abandoned her on a legendary island filled with thieves and little food. To survive she must keep to herself, learn to trust no one, and rely on the unique skills her mother taught her. The only thing that keeps her going is the goal of getting off the island, finding her father, and demanding her rightful place beside him and his crew. To do so Fable enlists the help of a young trader named West to get her off the island and across the Narrows to her father.
But her father’s rivalries and the dangers of his trading enterprise have only multiplied since she last saw him, and Fable soon finds that West isn’t who he seems. Together, they will have to survive more than the treacherous storms that haunt the Narrows if they’re going to stay alive.
Welcome to a world made dangerous by the sea and by those who wish to profit from it. Where a young girl must find her place and her family while trying to survive in a world built for men. Fable takes you on a spectacular journey filled with romance, intrigue, and adventure.
Fable (Fable, #1)Review:
I received Fable from NetGalley and the publishers and I’m so glad because I loved it. I don’t know that I’ll explain exactly how much I loved it or why. But I’m going to do my best.
Fable lives on an island that is a very dangerous place. She’s working on saving enough money to travel and face her father. The father that left her on said island four years ago. He left her to fend for herself and told her she wasn’t meant for his world. She is ready to prove him wrong. Once she’s finally saved enough money, she begs passage from West, the man she trades gems she finds while diving. As this is a novel, things don’t exactly as planned when Fable finally comes face to face with her father again. I’m going to stop there with the plot details. I loved Fable. She kicked and screamed and clawed her way off the island. She said and did whatever it took to come back to face her father. And when he didn’t respond in the way she wanted she made a new plan. She finds herself a new family in West and his crew. I absolutely adored the whole crew of the Magnolia. I loved their secrets, their hopes and dreams. I am beyond excited to see what the crew will do in the next book. We got to see them work together as a unit, a family, and I loved it. I loved getting to know West and Willa, Paj and Auster. I loved that there were queer characters.
The writing and the world building were stunning. The writing was lyrical and descriptive. The world building was so well done. I could see this world in vivid colors. At times, I felt as if I was somehow in the story alongside Fable. I will absolutely be picking up more books by Young. I was enthralled by this story, by the writing, by Fable’s fire. I couldn’t put it down until the final page. I cannot recommend this book enough for lovers of YA fantasy, or other sorts of ‘pirate’ stories.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.