The Queen of Nothing by Holly Black

GoodReads Summary:
After being pronounced Queen of Faerie and then abruptly exiled by the Wicked King Cardan, Jude finds herself unmoored, the queen of nothing. She spends her time with Vivi and Oak, watches her fair share of reality television, and does the odd job or two, including trying to convince a cannibalistic faerie from hunting her own in the mortal world.
When her twin sister Taryn shows up asking of a favor, Jude jumps at the chance to return to the Faerie world, even if it means facing Cardan, who she loves despite his betrayal.
When a dark curse is unveiled, Jude must become the first mortal Queen of Faerie and uncover how to break the curse, or risk upsetting the balance of the whole Faerie world.
The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air, #3)Review:
The much-anticipated finale of the Folk of the Air trilogy was…disappointing. I’m not going to say I didn’t like it, because I did. I very much enjoyed being back in the world with Jude and Cardan, but it wasn’t what I wanted.
Jude was not Jude for the first half of this book. Instead of scheming her way back into power, she seems to have accepted her exile and I hated that. Accepting her fate is not something that Jude from the first two books would have done. She finds herself again when she makes her way back into Faerie, but right around then is when a certain event happened that completely made the first half of the book pointless as well as the ending to The Wicked King. I don’t know why this is a trend that keeps happening in YA books, but I’m over authors completely undoing things from their previous books. It just makes me not care at all. I liked it when Jude found herself again though.
I also really liked how all the siblings finally came together for once to work together on the same side. I don’t like siblings betraying one another.
Cardan also wasn’t quite himself. I’m all for a happily ever after and romance and all that, but he’s supposed to be a cruel prince and a wicked king and in this book, he is none of those things. I did like him and Jude finally figuring things out, but I just wanted more.
That about sums up everything. I just wanted more from this book. It’s a short 300 pages, and it was clear in the book. The story dragged in the first half but then we were rushed through the end. I don’t understand why more time couldn’t have been spent to make this book better. Had more things been developed, it would have been an incredible finale.
I still liked The Queen of Nothing, I just wanted more.

Quotes:

“He will be the destruction of the crown and the ruination of the throne.”

“Wondering if some part of him is cold inside, a kind of cold that can never be warmed, like a shard of ice through the heart. Wondering if I have a shard like that, too.”

“We have lived in our armor for so long, you and I. And now I am not sure if either of us knows how to remove it.”

“Plunge a heated sword into oil and any small flaw will turn into a crack. But quenched in blood as you were, none of you broke. You were only hardened.”

“Maybe it isn’t the worst thing to want to be loved, even if you’re not. Even if it hurts. Maybe being human isn’t always being weak.”

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black

GoodReads Summary:
Tana lives in a world where walled cities called Coldtowns exist. In them, quarantined monsters and humans mingle in a decadently bloody mix of predator and prey. The only problem is, once you pass through Coldtown’s gates, you can never leave.
One morning, after a perfectly ordinary party, Tana wakes up surrounded by corpses. The only other survivors of this massacre are her exasperatingly endearing ex-boyfriend, infected and on the edge, and a mysterious boy burdened with a terrible secret. Shaken and determined, Tana enters a race against the clock to save the three of them the only way she knows how: by going straight to the wicked, opulent heart of Coldtown itself.
The Coldest Girl in Coldtown is a wholly original story of rage and revenge, of guilt and horror, and of love and loathing from bestselling and acclaimed author Holly Black.
The Coldest Girl in ColdtownReview:
Honestly, I am living for all of these backlist vampire stories that I somehow never read. To those that think the vampire craze had ended, they are completely wrong and should go away. I will be obsessed with vampires forever. My husband likes to joke that I have a fetish. (Really a joke or not? We may never know).
Tana was a main character I could get behind. She’s got trauma in her past, and because of that she’s trying to the right thing for her dad and her little sister. But also, she’s beyond intrigued by Gavriel, the mysterious vampire that she rescued along with her ex-boyfriend Aidan. I liked Tana. She never gave up even when it seemed like things just could not get any worse, the did. But that didn’t stop her. She made this story what it was.
Gavriel was interesting. I really enjoyed that we got his history throughout the story. It really gave us a better understanding of who he was and how he got where he is now. I couldn’t help but like him, even though he was kind of crazy.
Adian was an idiot. He was also kind of a jerk. I just wanted him to F off. I mostly liked the rest of the supporting characters. They were well developed and added the right stuff to the story. Except Pearl. Every time I read about her I couldn’t help but shake my head. I get that she’s just a little girl, raised in a world that glamorized vampires, but she was just too much.
Overall, I really loved this book. It was perfect for October. I loved the twist on vampire lore and the way the vampires changed the modern world. The only thing I didn’t like was the final chapter. I was left with just one question. Which was better than lots of questions, but it was a pretty important question. Despite that, I still loved this book.

Quotes:

“Every hero is the villain of his own story.”

“Even from the beginning, that was the problem. People liked pretty things. People even liked pretty things that wanted to kill and eat them.”

“We labor under so many illusions about ourselves until we’re stripped bare. Being infected, being a vampire, it’s always you. Maybe it’s more you than ever before. You, distilled. You, boiled down like a sauce. But it’s you as you always were, deep down inside.”

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Blogtober Book Review: The Wicked King by Holly Black

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Summary:
Jude has bound to the Wicked King, Cardan, to her, and made herself the power behind the throne. Navigating the constantly shifting political alliances of Faerie would be difficult enough if Cardan were biddable. But he does everything in his power to humiliate and undermine her, even as his fascination with her remains undiminished.
When it becomes all too clear that someone close to Jude means to betray her, threatening her life and the lives of everyone she loves, Jude must uncover the traitor and fight her own complicated feelings for Cardan to maintain control as a mortal in a faerie world.
The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air, #2)Review:
One half of me is upset I waited so long to read this series and the other half of me is upset that I didn’t wait until all three books were release. The thought of having to wait until November to see how the lives of these characters will play out is its own special kind of torture.
I loved The Wicked King. Holly Black writes a fascinating and completely compelling story. This book was so fast paced that I just couldn’t manage to put it down until the very last page. The writing sucked me in and spit me out an angry mess when it was over. I’m so mad at Holly Black for the way that she ended The Wicked King, but I’m also in complete and total awe of her talent.
Jude is such an interesting main character. Everything she does is for her family, and a little bit for herself too. She’s fiery and passionate. She doesn’t let anyone stand in the way of what she wants. She will go after her goals with a bloody vengeance. I loved how fierce she was. She’s ruthless, intelligent, and clever—a dangerous combination.
Then there’s Cardan. I love everything but the tail. And of course, the things he did in the final pages. But I’m hopeful that he did what he did for good reason and not to be an asshole. I adored all of the scenes he was in with Jude and I’m really hopeful to see where things end up with them. I also really enjoyed seeing him fill the role of King. It was really interesting to see him take so well to a position he never wanted.
Overall, I loved this book. I loved the characters. I loved the pace of the story. There was nothing but action and excitement and scheming and I loved every single page. I will very anxiously be awaiting the final book in the trilogy. If you haven’t read this series yet, what are you waiting for?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Cruel Prince by Holly Black

Summary:
Jude was seven when her parents were murdered and she and her two sisters were stolen away to live in the treacherous High Court of Faerie. Ten years later, Jude wants nothing more than to belong there, despite her mortality. But many of the fey despise humans. Especially Prince Cardan, the youngest and wickedest son of the High King.
To win a place at the Court, she must defy him–and face the consequences.
As Jude becomes more deeply embroiled in palace intrigues and deceptions, she discovers her own capacity for trickery and bloodshed. But as betrayal threatens to drown the Courts of Faerie in violence, Jude will need to risk her life in a dangerous alliance to save her sisters, and Faerie itself.
From #1 New York Times bestselling author Holly Black comes the first book in a stunning new trilogy filled with twists and enchantment, as one girl learns the meaning of true power when she finds herself caught in a web of royal faerie intrigue.
The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air #1)Review:
The Cruel Prince is one of the most hyped books I’ve ever read in my entire reading life. I’ve read other more hyped books but I always seem to read them BEFORE they get to be so hyped. I was a bit worried going into this book that the hype would make me hate it. I think that’s also part of the reason that I’ve taken so long to get around to reading this. Without any further delay, here come my thoughts on this beloved story.

“Never? Never is like forever-too big for mortals to comprehend.”

I was a little surprised at just how political this book really was. It makes sense that it’s a real political story, but I was just surprised by how much the politics and day to day life in faerie really is. I wished we had gotten a little more world building. I think the combination of fantasy and the modern-day world was really interesting. I would have liked to get a bit more setting wise of faerie. I think there was so much opportunity to really give details about the world around Jude, but we didn’t get that. We just got politics.

“The human species pretends it is so resilient. Mortal lives are one long game of make-believe. If you couldn’t lie to yourselves, you’d cut your own throats to end your misery.”

I liked the characters and the family dynamic in this book. I was a bit surprised by how much they seemed to care about one another and how they actually showed affection and all of that. I’ve heard over and over how the characters are cruel and vicious. They were, but not the family. Everything Jude did toward the end of the book was for her younger brother. I really enjoyed this aspect of the story. I love a good sibling story and I defiantly got some of that with this.

“I have lied and I have betrayed and I have triumphed. If only there was someone to congratulate me.”

Overall, I enjoyed this book. I wasn’t blown out of the water like so many others but I enjoyed it. I read it quickly. The plot twists surprised me. The characters were compelling and interesting. It just didn’t make my new favorites list. I definitely am excited to pick up the sequel soon.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.