The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black

GoodReads Summary:
Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.
Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.
At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.
Until one day, he does…
As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?
The Darkest Part of the ForestReview:
The Darkest Part of the Forest takes place in the same world as the Folk of the Air trilogy. Many were disappointed by the finale of that series and to those people I say, READ THIS BOOK RIGHT NOW. The Darkest Part of the Forest was everything I wanted from the Folk of the Air series. There were interesting and complex sibling relationships. There were romantic relationships that I was quickly invested in. Plus, there was all the fae drama that I loved from her other series, but more interesting.
The fae aspect of this story was so fascinating. This story takes place in the town of Fairfold where the fae come out to play with tourists. I loved this aspect of the story. The concept of magic in the world as I know it is so interesting to me. The fae in town don’t mess with the locals, only the tourists that come to see the horned boy in the glass coffin. The horned boy’s coffin is also the local’s party spot. This hit me in the high school feels because I totally partied in the woods during my high school years, so, I could totally see my friends in the party scenes with the horned boy.
When the coffin is found shattered and the horned boy awakes, life in Fairfold changes. I loved the relationship between Hazel and Ben. I really enjoyed getting to see their history. When they were children, they hunted fae with Ben using his musical ability and Hazel fighting them. There were some hard to read parts with these parts, but it just made the story that much better. Their relationship was so complicated and tangled, there were a lot of issues between them but I loved seeing them work through these issues and develop their relationships.
The romances were wonderful. I’m not going to specify who is with who because the wondering (for me) was a great part of the book. Both siblings find romance in these pages. Ben is gay and his romance was everything I wanted and more. The way his path led in this story was everything I wanted from Jude and Cardan. Hazel’s romance was also right up my alley. It was my favorite romance trope and I love how things turned out for them.
Overall, this book was so freaking good. I don’t know why more people haven’t read this. To all of the people that read and loved The Cruel Prince, please read this book because you will love this even more. The supporting characters were amazing. The mix of real-world and fae was great. I just loved everything about this book.

 

Quotes:

“Once, there was a girl who vowed she would save everyone in the world, but forgot herself.”

“Every child needs a tragedy to become truly interesting.”

“Down a path worn into the woods, past a stream and a hollowed-out log full of pill bugs and termites, was a glass coffin. It rested right on the ground, and in it slept a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives.”

“There don’t have to be first dates and second dates. We’re not normal. We can do this anyway you want. A relationship can be whatever you want it to be. We get to make this part up. We get to tell our own story.”

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Queen of Nothing by Holly Black

GoodReads Summary:
After being pronounced Queen of Faerie and then abruptly exiled by the Wicked King Cardan, Jude finds herself unmoored, the queen of nothing. She spends her time with Vivi and Oak, watches her fair share of reality television, and does the odd job or two, including trying to convince a cannibalistic faerie from hunting her own in the mortal world.
When her twin sister Taryn shows up asking of a favor, Jude jumps at the chance to return to the Faerie world, even if it means facing Cardan, who she loves despite his betrayal.
When a dark curse is unveiled, Jude must become the first mortal Queen of Faerie and uncover how to break the curse, or risk upsetting the balance of the whole Faerie world.
The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air, #3)Review:
The much-anticipated finale of the Folk of the Air trilogy was…disappointing. I’m not going to say I didn’t like it, because I did. I very much enjoyed being back in the world with Jude and Cardan, but it wasn’t what I wanted.
Jude was not Jude for the first half of this book. Instead of scheming her way back into power, she seems to have accepted her exile and I hated that. Accepting her fate is not something that Jude from the first two books would have done. She finds herself again when she makes her way back into Faerie, but right around then is when a certain event happened that completely made the first half of the book pointless as well as the ending to The Wicked King. I don’t know why this is a trend that keeps happening in YA books, but I’m over authors completely undoing things from their previous books. It just makes me not care at all. I liked it when Jude found herself again though.
I also really liked how all the siblings finally came together for once to work together on the same side. I don’t like siblings betraying one another.
Cardan also wasn’t quite himself. I’m all for a happily ever after and romance and all that, but he’s supposed to be a cruel prince and a wicked king and in this book, he is none of those things. I did like him and Jude finally figuring things out, but I just wanted more.
That about sums up everything. I just wanted more from this book. It’s a short 300 pages, and it was clear in the book. The story dragged in the first half but then we were rushed through the end. I don’t understand why more time couldn’t have been spent to make this book better. Had more things been developed, it would have been an incredible finale.
I still liked The Queen of Nothing, I just wanted more.

Quotes:

“He will be the destruction of the crown and the ruination of the throne.”

“Wondering if some part of him is cold inside, a kind of cold that can never be warmed, like a shard of ice through the heart. Wondering if I have a shard like that, too.”

“We have lived in our armor for so long, you and I. And now I am not sure if either of us knows how to remove it.”

“Plunge a heated sword into oil and any small flaw will turn into a crack. But quenched in blood as you were, none of you broke. You were only hardened.”

“Maybe it isn’t the worst thing to want to be loved, even if you’re not. Even if it hurts. Maybe being human isn’t always being weak.”

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Blogtober Book Review: The Wicked King by Holly Black

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Summary:
Jude has bound to the Wicked King, Cardan, to her, and made herself the power behind the throne. Navigating the constantly shifting political alliances of Faerie would be difficult enough if Cardan were biddable. But he does everything in his power to humiliate and undermine her, even as his fascination with her remains undiminished.
When it becomes all too clear that someone close to Jude means to betray her, threatening her life and the lives of everyone she loves, Jude must uncover the traitor and fight her own complicated feelings for Cardan to maintain control as a mortal in a faerie world.
The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air, #2)Review:
One half of me is upset I waited so long to read this series and the other half of me is upset that I didn’t wait until all three books were release. The thought of having to wait until November to see how the lives of these characters will play out is its own special kind of torture.
I loved The Wicked King. Holly Black writes a fascinating and completely compelling story. This book was so fast paced that I just couldn’t manage to put it down until the very last page. The writing sucked me in and spit me out an angry mess when it was over. I’m so mad at Holly Black for the way that she ended The Wicked King, but I’m also in complete and total awe of her talent.
Jude is such an interesting main character. Everything she does is for her family, and a little bit for herself too. She’s fiery and passionate. She doesn’t let anyone stand in the way of what she wants. She will go after her goals with a bloody vengeance. I loved how fierce she was. She’s ruthless, intelligent, and clever—a dangerous combination.
Then there’s Cardan. I love everything but the tail. And of course, the things he did in the final pages. But I’m hopeful that he did what he did for good reason and not to be an asshole. I adored all of the scenes he was in with Jude and I’m really hopeful to see where things end up with them. I also really enjoyed seeing him fill the role of King. It was really interesting to see him take so well to a position he never wanted.
Overall, I loved this book. I loved the characters. I loved the pace of the story. There was nothing but action and excitement and scheming and I loved every single page. I will very anxiously be awaiting the final book in the trilogy. If you haven’t read this series yet, what are you waiting for?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.