The Power by Naomi Alderman

GoodReads Summary:
In The Power the world is a recognisable place: there’s a rich Nigerian kid who lounges around the family pool; a foster girl whose religious parents hide their true nature; a local American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But something vital has changed, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power – they can cause agonising pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world changes utterly.
This extraordinary novel by Naomi Alderman, a Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year and Granta Best of British writer, is not only a gripping story of how the world would change if power was in the hands of women but also exposes, with breath-taking daring, our contemporary world.
The PowerReview:
I don’t know what I was expecting from this book, but the story I got what so far beyond that. To keep it short, this book is basically about women who gain electrical abilities. Some parts of the world, the women take over completely, other parts of the world, women gain power by hiding their power. I think this story was incredibly told from several different perspectives in different parts of the world. I think that is what made this book so great.
We follow Margot who is the Mayor when it’s discovered that girls have electrical abilities, her daughter being one of them. When Margot’s daughter wakes the power in Margot, she realizes that she needs to change the way things are being seen in the world. Everyone’s searching for a cure, but Margot wants to teach and train the girls instead of letting them be seen as potential enemies or threats. I thought Margot’s perspective was interesting and I was rooting for her.
Allie/Eve was also a super interesting character. She runs away from her foster family and finds herself at a convent. She hears a voice in her head and it was never totally clear to me whether this was a mental health thing or if there was actually someone talking in her head. I think her ability to influence the other girls at the convent and the way she used YouTube and the population to gain followers was fascinating.
Roxy was the daughter of a high level drug dealer. She was so fierce and powerful. I loved that she was still loyal to her family despite most of the world deciding that men were useless now. I liked that she had goals and aspirations. I liked that she was loyal to her friends, too.
Finally, Tunde was a Nigerian man who caught a picture of women using their power when it first started to appear. He was offered money in exchange for it, which motivated him to travel and continue getting photos and stories that no one else was getting. I think his story was the most fascinating because he was a man in a now female dominated world, so there were times he was really frightened and others he was genuinely afraid for his life. I think because he traveled so widely it gave the reader a chance to see so many different places and how things were going.
Overall, this was a fascinating story to see the world as we know it flipped to women having the power. I think it was also a really interesting choice to frame this story as if it was a historical story being written by a man in a far off future where women are still in charge. I was confused a bit at first as there was no mention of this, but I think it added such an interesting aspect to the story.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The First 7 by Laura Pohl

GoodReads Summary:
Clover Martinez and The Last Teenagers on Earth are busy exploring the galaxy after leaving earth behind…even if they can’t help but be a little homesick.
So when their ship receives a distress signal from their former planet, they hope against hope that it means other survivors. But as soon as they arrive, they realize something’s deeply wrong: strange crystal formations have popped up everywhere and there’s some sort of barrier keeping them from leaving.
Seeking the origin of the formations and the reason for the barrier, the group discovers a colony of survivors hidden in the mountains. But the survivors aren’t who they seem…
The First 7 (The Last 8, #2)Review:
I enjoyed The Last 8 so much that I immediately had to start the audiobook for book two, The First 7. I loved The First 7 so much that I listened to the entire audiobook in one afternoon.
I loved this book for the characters. I enjoyed the plot and the whole storyline, but I was so invested in the characters and oh boy, was there drama with this found family. I’ll mention the storyline first and then I can get into what I actually want to talk about today. I was interested in the storyline. At the end of book one, our characters travel into space. At the start of this book, we get to see the characters in space after exploring for several months. There is an altercation toward one of the Last Teenagers and they leave the planet they’re on. When they return to their ship, they receive a distress signal. A distress signal that was coming from Earth. They argue about whether or not to return and see what or who sent this signal.
After returning to Earth, they realize that they weren’t the last humans on Earth. Other people survived. They arrive near the community called Unity. But they soon have more problems to solve than they bargained for. Something happens to one of their friends that they need to figure out and there is this barrier preventing them from going back into space. I will say that I completely saw through one of the smaller twists, but I was stumped about most of what was actually going on. The mystery and suspense of waiting for this found family to find all the answers was really well done.
Now, the characters. Sadly, this friend group has some issues during this book. They’re at odds because some of them aren’t acting like they’re worried about the problems anymore and they just want to stay and live in normal lives in Unity. But the problems that are in this book are ones that really need to be solved. So, the half of the group that’s working on it is mad at the other half for not making any effort. There’s all sorts of issues and hurtful things are said. It was really hard to see this found family that I loved be so at odds with one another. But I was really happy with the resolution and how they all worked the issues out. There were moments of putting their fights aside for bigger issues, but they also talked about what their fights were really about and I liked that a lot.
Overall, I really enjoyed this book. I think the narrator did a really great job with both of these books. I will definitely listen to more books that have this narrator. I really enjoyed getting to see these characters return to Earth and I thought the plot was interesting. I will absolutely be reading more books by Pohl in the future. This was a diverse story that followed characters that weren’t always easy to love, but had wonderful growth and development.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Golden Son by Pierce Brown

GoodReads Summary:
As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. And so Darrow sacrifices himself in the name of the greater good for which Eo, his true love and inspiration, laid down her own life. He becomes a Gold, infiltrating their privileged realm so that he can destroy it from within.
A lamb among wolves in a cruel world, Darrow finds friendship, respect, and even love—but also the wrath of powerful rivals. To wage and win the war that will change humankind’s destiny, Darrow must confront the treachery arrayed against him, overcome his all-too-human desire for retribution—and strive not for violent revolt but a hopeful rebirth. Though the road ahead is fraught with danger and deceit, Darrow must choose to follow Eo’s principles of love and justice to free his people.
He must live for more.
Golden Son (Red Rising Saga, #2)Review:
Golden Son was somehow even more wild than Red Rising. I really didn’t think that was possible, but apparently it was. In this book, it’s two years after the end of Red Rising. Darrow has started working for the man that killed his wife. He’s been sent to the Academy which seems to me like a more relevant version of the Institute. I don’t want to get too much into the plot (and that will probably continue in my reviews for the rest of the series).
Darrow is such an interesting character. He’s born a Red but was carved into a Gold and thrown into their world. He’s still the boy that grew up in the mines, but he’s also now a man that has killed. He’s a Red that’s been turned into a leader. He isn’t with his loyal friends that he made during his time at the Institute at the start of the book, but they do eventually all come together. I didn’t love the start of the book because it felt like I’d missed a bunch of time because I had. There was more than a year of time that we just didn’t get to see. We do get a few memories of that time, but I was confused at first.
I didn’t really start loving this book until the crew got back together. I missed Darrow being with Mustang and Severo and all of the friends. Darrow is completely in his element when he has his friends. I liked that he was still thinking about how it would be hard to do what he was sent to do when that meant betraying the people that were loyal to him.
I really loved that we got to know more about the Sons of Ares. I didn’t like the first meeting with them in this book because who and what we saw wasn’t what the Sons of Ares were supposed to be about. So, when we see other members that we already know, it was exactly what I wanted it to be. I love the plot twists that involved the Sons of Ares because I totally didn’t see them coming. And the ending was absolutely devastating.
Overall, this book was just as violent and gory as the first book. It was excellent. I loved Darrow. I loved getting to see another planet in this universe. I liked the politics. This was a very political story and I really enjoyed that. I love all the characters and their relationships. I liked how thoughtful Darrow was about the things he was doing. I can’t wait to continue the series. I do want to say that I listened to the audiobook for this book and the narrator was incredible. I will absolutely be continuing the rest of the series on audio because I loved the narrator so much.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

GoodReads Summary:
Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he works all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of Mars livable for future generations.
Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better world for his children.
But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity already reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and sprawling parks spread across the planet. Darrow—and Reds like him—are nothing more than slaves to a decadent ruling class.
Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow sacrifices everything to infiltrate the legendary Institute, a proving ground for the dominant Gold caste, where the next generation of humanity’s overlords struggle for power. He will be forced to compete for his life and the very future of civilization against the best and most brutal of Society’s ruling class. There, he will stop at nothing to bring down his enemies… even if it means he has to become one of them to do so.
Red Rising (Red Rising Saga, #1)Review:
Wow, I have been sleeping on this series. Someone gifted me the ebook and I put off reading it for so long. Now, I might be obsessed. I don’t own the rest of the series, but at the recommendation of a friend, I’m going to continue the series via audiobooks.
Darrow is a Red. This means that he is a part of the lowest color in his world. He works in the mines every day. He works hard thinking that he will someday help the other colors be able to live on the surface of Mars. But when his wife is hanged, he takes her down and buries her body, knowing that this will sentence him to death. But instead of dying, he wakes up among the Sons of Ares. The Sons of Ares is a rebellion that it working toward changing the color system. They show Darrow that the higher colors have terraformed the surface of Mars hundreds of years ago and there are even some Reds that live and work on the surface. He realizes that his people are nothing short of slaves, mining for the higher colors. The Sons of Ares give him the task of becoming a Gold and testing to get into the Institute, something they’ve tried and failed to do in the past.
This is where the story really gets interesting. I really enjoyed the start of the story, seeing how much Darrow loves his family and his wife, Eo. I also enjoyed the process of Darrow being made into a Gold. But when he passes the test and gets to the Institute, the story is almost non-stop action. I will say that this story was very graphic and gruesome, so if you don’t like that sort of thing, maybe skip this one. But I loved every second of it. It was a fascinating conversation about humanity. I think the tests they endure at the Institute were horrific and complex, but completely captivating.
Overall, I really liked this book. It was dark and gritty, but also occasionally hopeful. It’s a story about one kid being sent on a mission to change the way of the world. I hope we get to see Darrow get some support from the Sons of Ares now that he’s passed the Institute’s tests. I think the ending was perfect to leave the reader wanting more. I liked that Darrow made friends among the Golds even though it complicates his plans. I also really liked that Darrow actively thought about this. He couldn’t help but make friends, but it weighed on his heart that he was going to have to betray them eventually. I’m very excited to continue the series.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The 100 by Kass Morgan

GoodReads Summary:
Ever since a devastating nuclear war, humanity has lived on spaceships far above Earth’s radioactive surface. Now, one hundred juvenile delinquents—considered expendable by society—are being sent on a dangerous mission: to recolonize the planet. It could be their second chance at life…or it could be a suicide mission.
CLARKE was arrested for treason, though she’s haunted by the memory of what she really did. WELLS, the chancellor’s son, came to Earth for the girl he loves—but will she ever forgive him? Reckless BELLAMY fought his way onto the transport pod to protect his sister, the other half of the only pair of siblings in the universe. And GLASS managed to escape back onto the ship, only to find that life there is just as dangerous as she feared it would be on Earth.
Confronted with a savage land and haunted by secrets from their pasts, the hundred must fight to survive. They were never meant to be heroes, but they may be mankind’s last hope.
The 100 (The 100, #1)Review:
I have to start this review with a little backstory. I have been wanting to read this series for quite a few years because I watch (read: am obsessed with) the tv show. The final season of the 100 tv show is starting and I thought I would try to catch up with the books before I finish the show. I might even rewatch the whole show after I read the whole book series. Okay, onto the book review.
The 100 follows 100 people that are under 18 and have been arrested. The space station they grew up on is running out of air, so the higher-ups need to figure out if Earth is livable again or not. We follow four different points of view and their stories. I really enjoyed the science fiction parts of this story. The concept of the human race destroying the Earth is not out of the realm of possibilities, and I’ve always been fascinated by space. I would love to travel in space and live there as well. I didn’t love the class issues that still lingered in space. This was something that was changed in the show, there were different stations, but none were better than another.
Clarke is the first point of view we see. We get her backstory as well as where she currently is. I really liked her. She’s smart and creative. She’s good in hard situations. I thought she was strong and well developed. I thought the backstory with her parents (which is different in the book from the show) was dark but somehow fascinating.
Wells is the chancellor’s son. He’s also Clarke’s ex-boyfriend and the reason that her parents died. I thought that Wells had the hardest journey. He purposefully committed a crime so that he would be sent to Earth alongside Clarke. Was that choice worth it? He’s made to be ‘other’ because he is the son of the chancellor. He’s familiar with leadership, but when he tries to share what he knows, he’s shunned. Wells is determined and continues trying to be helpful which I liked. I’m interested to see how his story compares to the show in the next book.
Bellamy is my favorite. I love him in the book and the show. I also totally ship him with Clarke. Bellamy did whatever he needed to get onto the ship that held his sister, the one going to Earth. His sister, that he doesn’t know as well as he thinks he does, that never should have been born. Bellamy isn’t afraid of making waves or pissing people off. But he quickly proves that he’s probably the most prepared to survive on Earth. I will love him forever.
Then there’s Glass. She’s not even in the show so I was interested right from the start. Glass was supposed to be one of the 100, but snuck off the ship through the air vents to see her boyfriend, Luke. I had a love/hate relationship with her story. Her history is not pretty. She’s a part of the wealthier station and Luke is not. So, when certain events happen, she says hateful things and breaks up with him to protect him. But once she sees him again, the truth starts to come out. I’m definitely interested to see where her story goes. There are more secrets to be spilled and I thought it was an interesting choice to keep one of the perspectives on the space station.
Overall, I definitely enjoyed this book. I’m very excited to continue the series and see what happens to these characters that I love dearly.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Shatter City by Scott Westerfeld

GoodReads Summary:
When the world sees Frey, they think they see her twin sister Rafi. Frey was raised to be Rafi’s double, and now she’s taken on the role . . . without anyone else knowing.
Her goal? To destroy the forces that created her.
But with the world watching and a rebellion rising, Frey is forced into a detour. Suddenly she is stranded on her own in Paz, a city where many of the citizens attempt to regulate their emotions through an interface on their arms. Paz is an easy place to get lost . . . and also an easy place to lose yourself.
As the city comes under a catastrophic attack, Frey must leave the shadows and enter the chaos of warfare – because there is no other way for her to find her missing sister and have her revenge against her murderous father.
Shatter City (Impostors #2)Review:
As I’ve mentioned with literally all the other books that take place in this world, this book was full of action and excitement. We’re still following Frey like we were in the first book, but when the story starts, she’s back to pretending to be her sister. This was one of the things I didn’t like about this book. There were so many instances where the twins had to or chose to pretend to be the other. I honestly felt bad for Frey because she just wanted to be herself, for once, but so many things were preventing that. I just wanted her to be herself like she wished so badly. Despite not liking this aspect, I still liked Frey. She was strong and determined. She made choices that maybe weren’t always the right ones, but she made them with her head and her heart.
We get to see so much more of the world in Shatter City as the characters travel all over. I liked seeing the familiar places, like Diego, as much as I liked getting to discover new ones. Along with seeing the world, the plot was complex and interesting. There were so many different storylines being brought together. Some were resolved in this book, which I liked, and some left for the next one.
Overall, I didn’t enjoy this as much as the first book but I still liked it. It was an exciting story with characters that I cared about. I’m eagerly awaiting book threes release. Also, I just have to add that I swear to god if we don’t get to see Tally in this series I’m going to be so mad.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Impostors by Scott Westerfeld

GoodReads Summary:
Frey and Rafi are inseparable . . . two edges of the same knife. But Frey’s very existence is a secret.
Frey is Rafi’s twin sister-and her body double. Their powerful father has many enemies, and the world has grown dangerous as the old order falls apart. So while Rafi was raised to be the perfect daughter, Frey has been taught to kill. Her only purpose is to protect her sister, to sacrifice herself for Rafi if she must.
When her father sends Frey in Rafi’s place as collateral in a precarious deal, she becomes the perfect impostor-as poised and charming as her sister. But Col, the son of a rival leader, is getting close enough to spot the killer inside her. As the deal starts to crumble, Frey must decide if she can trust him with the truth . . . and if she can risk becoming her own person.
With Impostors, master storyteller Scott Westerfeld returns with a new series set in the world of his mega-bestselling Uglies.
ImpostorsReview:
I have been waiting to read this book until I managed to reread the entire Uglies series and I’m so glad I did. Impostors takes place around fifteen years after the end of Specials. Like with Extras, I really enjoyed getting to see the aftermath of Tally’s actions and to see how the world was changed by her revolution. I also really enjoyed getting to see a different part of this world that I’ve loved for so many years. This was such a different book from Extras and I really enjoyed that.
We follow Fray as she’s sent to a neighboring city as a hostage. She’s the extra daughter. The body double for her twin sister, Rafia. The world doesn’t even know she exists. I thought she was such a complicated and interesting character. Her struggle of loving her sister but hating her father was so interesting. I loved her strength and how out of place she felt. It was fascinating to see her in a situation she wasn’t comfortable in (pretending to be Rafia full time) but then becoming herself again (after her father does some terrible things) and showing who she really is. I liked that it didn’t take very long for her to share her secret because I hate the secret keeping trope. I loved the sister relationship because I’m a sucker for siblings in books, but I have a bad feeling about Rafia for some reason.
Then there’s Col. I totally liked him from the start. I thought he was interesting despite his “boring” reputation. He loves his family and his people. He’s a natural leader and just a really good friend. I’m so excited and anxious about how this book ended with Fray and Col so I’ve borrowed book two from the library while I wait for the paperback edition to be published (to match the rest of the series).
Overall, like most of Westerfeld’s books, this was full of action and adventure. It was a fast-paced story and I couldn’t wait to find out what was going to happen next. I’ve quickly become so invested in these characters and their storylines. I cannot wait to continue the series.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Extras by Scott Westerfeld

GoodReads Summary:
A few years after rebel Tally Youngblood takes down the Specials regime, a cultural renaissance sweeps the world. “Tech-heads” flaunt their latest gadgets, “kickers” spread gossip and trends, and “surge monkeys” are hooked on extreme plastic surgery. Popularity rules, and everyone craves fame.
Fifteen-year-old Aya Fuse is no exception. But Aya’s face rank is so low, she’s a total nobody. An extra. Her only chance at stardom is to kick a wild and unexpected story.
Then she stumbles upon a big secret. Aya knows she is on the cusp of celebrity. But the information she is about to disclose will change both her fate…and that of the brave new world.
Extras (Uglies, #4)Review:
Part of me remembers not liking this book the first time I read it. I think that’s because I really loved the first three books so much that getting a fourth book that takes place in a different city with totally different characters (for the first half) was annoying to me. But rereading it years later, I actually really enjoyed it.
Extras takes place about three years after the ending of Specials. So the world is working on figuring out how to continue, but it’s been enough time to see what Aya’s city has become. There’s nothing but freedom. So, everyone looks different based on what interests them. I thought that this book taking place in a different city was wonderful. We got to see a different part of the world we knew and how it’s changed since the “mind rain.” I thought this book was really interesting in the sense that it says a lot about social media (in a form different from what we know today) and people’s desire to chase fame.
We follow Aya who is fifteen and just wants a story big enough to boost her ranking. I liked Aya, though she could be a little annoying at times with her fierce desire to be well known. Despite that, she really learned a lot about herself and grew as the book went on, which I appreciated. I liked that her brother was a big part of the story because I’m always here for good sibling relationships.
Like the other books in this series, the story was fast-paced and full of action. I also really like the suspense and mystery of what the characters were trying to uncover. It was a compelling plot.
Overall, I enjoyed this book and I’m very excited to continue in this world with the Imposters series, which I believe is set in the same world.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Specials by Scott Westerfeld

GoodReads Summary:
Tally thought they were a rumor, but now she’s one of them. A Special. A super-amped fighting machine, engineered to keep the uglies down and the pretties stupid.
But maybe being perfectly programmed with strength and focus isn’t better than anything she’s ever known. Tally still has memories of something else.
Still, it’s easy to tune that out—until she’s offered a chance to stamp out the rebels of the New Smoke permanently. It all comes down to one last choice: listen to that tiny, faint heartbeat, or carry out the mission she’s programmed to complete. Either way, Tally’s world will never be the same.
Specials (Uglies, #3)Review:
My issues with this book are pretty much the same as they were with the previous book. I didn’t like the group of “new” specials that Shay created. They centered around self-harm, specifically cutting, and I really didn’t like that. I did like how Tally stood up and stopped cutting because she knew it wasn’t right, despite that sometimes it made her feel good.
Tally kind of annoyed me in this book, but it wasn’t really her fault. It was more than at the beginning of each book Tally was having to go through everything she’d just succeeded in the previous book. It was a little repetitive and just annoying. All her progress was lost at the end of each book and she had to go through it all over again. Despite this, I still liked Tally. She’s been through some shit at this point. I loved her and Zane together and was sad that we didn’t really get that in this book (I’m also just mad in general about Zane’s storyline).
I did really like how Shay and Tally we’re together again in Specials. They didn’t really have a very healthy relationship because of their past betrayals. I liked how their relationship was left. I think their forgiving one another and reconciliation was satisfying.
Overall, like the first two books, Specials was action-packed, fast-paced, and exciting. I know the fourth book doesn’t really follow the same characters but I’m still excited to see what’s going on in this world next. I really liked getting to see more of the world and the other cities in it. I thought it was interesting how things were all brought together from Tally’s various adventures. I also remember being really mad about the ending of this book when I read it the first time years ago, but I actually kind of liked it. I think it was a fitting end to who Tally has shown herself to be. I also appreciated that the romance between her and David wasn’t just immediately resumed. I’m going to stop now so I can read Extras.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Pretties by Scott Westerfeld

GoodReads Summary:
Tally has finally become pretty. Now her looks are beyond perfect, her clothes are awesome, her boyfriend is totally hot, and she’s completely popular. It’s everything she’s ever wanted.
But beneath all the fun — the nonstop parties, the high-tech luxury, the total freedom — is a nagging sense that something’s wrong. Something important. Then a message from Tally’s ugly past arrives. Reading it, Tally remembers what’s wrong with pretty life, and the fun stops cold.
Now she has to choose between fighting to forget what she knows and fighting for her life — because the authorities don’t intend to let anyone with this information survive.
Pretties (Uglies, #2)Review:
Sadly, I liked Pretties less than the first book. My feelings were much the same as the first. The story was action-packed with high stakes and interesting characters. But those characters that I loved so much from the first book just weren’t the same.
Tally, the main character, made similar mistakes. She kept secrets which led to damaging her relationship with Shay. Her friendship with Shay was one of my favorite things about the first book and Shay became a sort of villain in this book. I guess it’s more of collateral damage than a villain, but I really didn’t like her. Tally was the same, fearless and fighting for what she believed to be right.
The parts with Shay toward the end were hard for me. Shay and a group of friends start cutting themselves and I really didn’t like that. I think there were definitely other ways the plot could have gone.
Then there’s Zane. I wasn’t really sold on Tally and David’s romance so I was happy to see Zane. I thought his history was interesting and brought complex plot lines to the story. I totally loved his romance with Tally. They made each other better and were mostly honest with one another. There were no big secrets aside from things they’d done in the past.
Overall, I definitely preferred the first book but I still had fun reading this. We see more of this bizarre futuristic world. I’m wondering what, if any, part that will play in future books. The storyline gets more complex with higher stakes. I was engaged the whole time I was reading and definitely left with a fierce desire to immediately pick up the next book.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

GoodReads Summary:
Tally is about to turn sixteen, and she can’t wait. In just a few weeks she’ll have the operation that will turn her from a repellent ugly into a stunning pretty. And as a pretty, she’ll be catapulted into a high-tech paradise where her only job is to have fun.
But Tally’s new friend Shay isn’t sure she wants to become a pretty. When Shay runs away, Tally learns about a whole new side of the pretty world– and it isn’t very pretty. The authorities offer Tally a choice: find her friend and turn her in, or never turn pretty at all. Tally’s choice will change her world forever.
Uglies (Uglies, #1)Review:
I have been wanting to reread this series forever. I read it so many times when it first came out and in my later years of high school. I’ve always been a lover of dystopian books. So, after meeting Scott Westerfeld last year and hearing all about how the fan art for this series inspired and changed his writing, I really wanted to reread it. Also, he’s continuing the series and I want to read those too.
I genuinely enjoyed Uglies. I was worried it wouldn’t hold up, but it did. There were a few tropes that I don’t particularly care for, but overall it was action-packed and I flew through the story. There was secret-keeping (the part I don’t care for) but the characters were so well developed and I grew to love them so much that I understood the motivations for the secrets. I really loved Tally. She was a girl beyond excited to turn pretty. But her world gets turned upside down. Everything she’s grown up knowing has been shown to be a lie. She handled the challenges really well and did her best to make better choices. I also totally adored her friendship with Shay. I loved that they were fast friends. Their adventures leading up to their birthday were the best.
Shay was an interesting supporting character. She and Tally fight (over a boy, eye roll) but there’s so much more to their relationship. I’m interested to see how things will continue in book two. I liked that Shay was so sure of what she wanted and so sure about Tally that she wanted her to join.
I’m not sold on David in the romantic sense. Their romance seemed a bit fast, but I liked him as a character. He’s unique in this world of ‘uglies’ raised to believe certain things. I liked his history and his strong morals.
Overall, I really enjoyed this book and I’m really hoping that continues for the rest of the series. I’m currently typing this review on my phone so I can go get and start Pretties as soon as I’m done.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Not a Drop to Drink by Mindy McGinnis

GoodReads Summary:
Lynn knows every threat to her pond: drought, a snowless winter, coyotes, and, most importantly, people looking for a drink. She makes sure anyone who comes near the pond leaves thirsty, or doesn’t leave at all.
Confident in her own abilities, Lynn has no use for the world beyond the nearby fields and forest. Having a life means dedicating it to survival, and the constant work of gathering wood and water. Having a pond requires the fortitude to protect it, something Mother taught her well during their quiet hours on the rooftop, rifles in hand.
But wisps of smoke on the horizon mean one thing: strangers. The mysterious footprints by the pond, nighttime threats, and gunshots make it all too clear Lynn has exactly what they want, and they won’t stop until they get it….
With evocative, spare language and incredible drama, danger, and romance, debut author Mindy McGinnis depicts one girl’s journey in a barren world not so different than our own.
Not a Drop to Drink (Not a Drop to Drink, #1)Review:
It seems that McGinnis’s books are hit or miss for me. I’ve absolutely loved some of them and really didn’t like others. This is one that I didn’t love. I didn’t dislike it, but it wasn’t what I wanted.
Lynn was kind of horrible. I understood why, and she definitely grows by the end of the book, but she was still kind of annoying. Honestly, the best part of this book was Lynn’s character growth, but it’s still not saying much.
I just wanted more from this book. I thought it was going to be more like Dry by Neal Shusterman where the characters travel and search for water. But it really wasn’t about the water at all.
Overall, I was disappointed. I’m not sure if I’m going to read the second book, but I might because the synopsis sounds more like they’ll be traveling and I think I might like that.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

A Beginning at the End by Mike Chen

GoodReads Summary:
Six years after a global pandemic wiped out most of the planet’s population, the survivors are rebuilding the country, split between self-governing cities, hippie communes and wasteland gangs.
In postapocalyptic San Francisco, former pop star Moira has created a new identity to finally escape her past—until her domineering father launches a sweeping public search to track her down. Desperate for a fresh start herself, jaded event planner Krista navigates the world on behalf of those too traumatized to go outside, determined to help everyone move on—even if they don’t want to. Rob survived the catastrophe with his daughter, Sunny, but lost his wife. When strict government rules threaten to separate parent and child, Rob needs to prove himself worthy in the city’s eyes by connecting with people again.
Krista, Moira, Rob and Sunny are brought together by circumstance, and their lives begin to twine together. But when reports of another outbreak throw the fragile society into panic, the friends are forced to finally face everything that came before—and everything they still stand to lose.
Because sometimes having one person is enough to keep the world going.
A Beginning at the EndReview:
After reading and completely loving Mike Chen’s first book (Here and Now and Then) I had really high hopes for A Beginning at the End and it was definitely one of my anticipated releases. Sadly, I’m really glad I got it from the library so I didn’t waste money on this book. I really didn’t love it.
Chen’s writing definitely had me drawn into the story and I felt like I was enjoying it while I was reading and actually in the story. But once I finished the final pages and closed the book I felt like I had no idea what I’d just read.
We’re in a post-apocalyptic world, one that’s managed to rebuilt (or is in the process of rebuilding anyway). There are three characters that we follow and they each have a different view on the world. I did like the characters, they were pretty much what made this book because their actions were so low stakes (in an overall sense) and I loved that they were all brought together, but their goals were just not what this book should have been about. I don’t want to complain too much because there was growth and development for each character, but I just was disappointed after how much I loved Chen’s first book.
Overall, this was a miss for me. But I love this author, so I’d definitely still recommend it because not all of us have the exact same reading taste. So, feel free to give it a try!

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

GoodReads Summary:
Juliette hasn’t touched anyone in exactly 264 days.
The last time she did, it was an accident, but The Reestablishment locked her up for murder. No one knows why Juliette’s touch is fatal. As long as she doesn’t hurt anyone else, no one really cares. The world is too busy crumbling to pieces to pay attention to a 17-year-old girl. Diseases are destroying the population, food is hard to find, birds don’t fly anymore, and the clouds are the wrong color.
The Reestablishment said their way was the only way to fix things, so they threw Juliette in a cell. Now so many people are dead that the survivors are whispering war – and The Reestablishment has changed its mind. Maybe Juliette is more than a tortured soul stuffed into a poisonous body. Maybe she’s exactly what they need right now.
Juliette has to make a choice: Be a weapon. Or be a warrior.
Shatter Me (Shatter Me, #1)Review:
I read the Shatter Me series years ago when it first came out but thought it was time for a reread because I don’t remember a single thing about the series and there are more books in it now that I haven’t read.
Sadly, I didn’t really like this book. The writing was flowery and I kind of liked that. It was pretty in a world that was sort of terrible. Juliette was annoying. Her relationship with Adam wasn’t very believable. Also, the things that happen with them toward the end of the book was disappointing. She loves him so much but won’t fight for him? Not believable to me.
Warner was a subpar villain. He’s annoying bad. I just didn’t really love anything about this book. I’m told the next one is way better and I’m already about halfway through it. I may continue to book three, but I might not. I guess you all shall find out in my review of book two when I finish it.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Fever King by Victoria Lee

GoodReads Summary:
In the former United States, sixteen-year-old Noam Álvaro wakes up in a hospital bed, the sole survivor of the viral magic that killed his family and made him a technopath. His ability to control technology attracts the attention of the minister of defense and thrusts him into the magical elite of the nation of Carolinia.
The son of undocumented immigrants, Noam has spent his life fighting for the rights of refugees fleeing magical outbreaks—refugees Carolinia routinely deports with vicious efficiency. Sensing a way to make a change, Noam accepts the minister’s offer to teach him the science behind his magic, secretly planning to use it against the government. But then he meets the minister’s son—cruel, dangerous, and achingly beautiful—and the way forward becomes less clear.
Caught between his purpose and his heart, Noam must decide who he can trust and how far he’s willing to go in pursuit of the greater good.
The Fever King (Feverwake, #1)Review:
I have to be honest here, as I am with all of my reviews. I almost chose not to finish this book because for the first twenty percent or so I was just bored. Things didn’t really get interesting until after Noam and Dara finally started talking. I loved Dara immediately. He’s precious and needs to be protected at all costs. I can’t wait to see what’s going to happen with him in the next book. I thought he was so complex and interesting. It was clear that there was more going on than was shown on the page and I loved learning his secrets.
Noam annoyed me a little because it was so clear who was really the villain, but also I could see things from his perspective and why he felt the way he did. I learned to love Noam and respect his choices. I’m very interested to see how things will play out with where this first book was concluded.
I really enjoyed the world-building of this futuristic America but I would have liked to see a bit more of it. We’re only told a bit about the different areas but I would have liked to actually see some of the other places.
Overall, I ended up really enjoying this book. It was a little slow in the beginning but definitely picked up as the story went along. I’m definitely excited to see what is going to happen in book two, which I will be picking up in the next few days as I’m lucky enough to get an ARC.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.