Twice in a Blue Moon by Christina Lauren

GoodReads Summary:
Sam Brandis was Tate Jones’s first: Her first love. Her first everything. Including her first heartbreak.
During a whirlwind two-week vacation abroad, Sam and Tate fell for each other in only the way that first loves do: sharing all of their hopes, dreams, and deepest secrets along the way. Sam was the first, and only, person that Tate—the long-lost daughter of one of the world’s biggest film stars—ever revealed her identity to. So when it became clear her trust was misplaced, her world shattered for good.
Fourteen years later, Tate, now an up-and-coming actress, only thinks about her first love every once in a blue moon. When she steps onto the set of her first big break, he’s the last person she expects to see. Yet here Sam is, the same charming, confident man she knew, but even more alluring than she remembered. Forced to confront the man who betrayed her, Tate must ask herself if it’s possible to do the wrong thing for the right reason… and whether “once in a lifetime” can come around twice.
Twice in a Blue MoonReview:
Twice in a Blue Moon is a novel that I was generously provided via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I always expect that I’m going to like Christina Lauren’s books more than I do. That’s not to say that I didn’t enjoy this one, because did. I just didn’t love it.
I really enjoyed the first half of Tate’s story when she was young. I felt like this was a good way for the reader to get to know her. I liked that we saw her younger and then flashing forward to her present. I think we got to know less about Tate in the second half, aside from her issues with her father.
I also really liked Sam. But he felt kind of generic. I feel this way about most of the characters. They have like one or two personal details, unless they’re Tate or her family.
Overall, I enjoyed this book. It was quick and fun to read, but didn’t blow me away.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Autoboyography by Christina Lauren

Summary:
Three years ago, Tanner Scott’s family relocated from California to Utah, a move that nudged the bisexual teen temporarily back into the closet. Now, with one semester of high school to go, and no obstacles between him and out-of-state college freedom, Tanner plans to coast through his remaining classes and clear out of Utah.
But when his best friend Autumn dares him to take Provo High’s prestigious Seminar—where honor roll students diligently toil to draft a book in a semester—Tanner can’t resist going against his better judgment and having a go, if only to prove to Autumn how silly the whole thing is. Writing a book in four months sounds simple. Four months is an eternity.
It turns out, Tanner is only partly right: four months is a long time. After all, it takes only one second for him to notice Sebastian Brother, the Mormon prodigy who sold his own Seminar novel the year before and who now mentors the class. And it takes less than a month for Tanner to fall completely in love with him.
AutoboyographyReview:
Autoboyography is the first book I have received in a bookish exchange that I am doing with a few of my closest book friends. This is a favorite of my friend Jenny @ So She Tries. It’s a book that I’ve been wanting to read for a while and even more so after reading The Unhoneymooners. (What’s up with these book titles?)
I loved so many things about this book. Let’s start with Tanner. I love his family and their relationship. Despite moving to a not so queer-friendly town, they’ve made their home a safe and welcoming place for him to be himself. They support him in every way that they can. I loved that his parents were present and involved in his life, always giving their opinions and trying to guide him in the right direction, but still mostly letting him make his own decisions.
The next relationship I really loved was between Tanner and his best friend Autumn. I didn’t love that he took so long to come out to her, but I also don’t know what it’s like to be in that kind of situation. I was happy when he finally told her the truth and loved her reaction. He and Autumn reminded me so much of myself and my husband when we were in high school. They made me laugh and the nostalgia was real. I loved the way things were left with them at the end of Autoboyography.
Finally, the love interest. I had a love/hate relationship with Sebastian. I loved him and Tanner together, but I didn’t love how his religion got in the way. I think some really interesting conversations were brought to the table. I liked the way that things worked out in the end, but I struggled with their relationship. It was hard because Tanner knew exactly who he was and what he felt and Sebastian was in a different place. He wanted to be someone that his family wouldn’t accept and that was hard to digest at times.
Overall, I adored this story. I am so happy that I was able to finally read it and I definitely will be reading more by Christina Lauren. I cannot wait to see what else they come up with for their young adult readers.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Unhoneymooners by Christina Lauren

GoodReads Summary:
Olive is always unlucky: in her career, in love, in…well, everything. Her identical twin sister Ami, on the other hand, is probably the luckiest person in the world. Her meet-cute with her fiancé is something out of a romantic comedy (gag) and she’s managed to finance her entire wedding by winning a series of Internet contests (double gag). Worst of all, she’s forcing Olive to spend the day with her sworn enemy, Ethan, who just happens to be the best man.
Olive braces herself to get through 24 hours of wedding hell before she can return to her comfortable, unlucky life. But when the entire wedding party gets food poisoning from eating bad shellfish, the only people who aren’t affected are Olive and Ethan. And now there’s an all-expenses-paid honeymoon in Hawaii up for grabs.
Putting their mutual hatred aside for the sake of a free vacation, Olive and Ethan head for paradise, determined to avoid each other at all costs. But when Olive runs into her future boss, the little white lie she tells him is suddenly at risk to become a whole lot bigger. She and Ethan now have to pretend to be loving newlyweds, and her luck seems worse than ever. But the weird thing is that she doesn’t mind playing pretend. In fact, she feels kind of… lucky.
The UnhoneymoonersReview:
The summer time is my favorite time of year to read all the romance novels. So with all of the different people raving about this book, I knew I had to pick up The Unhoneymooners.
I really enjoyed this book. The characters were funny and entertaining. I adored the hate to love trope, plus a little bit of fake dating thrown in there. I thought it was such a fun romance. It will full of the miscommunications and misunderstandings, which I usually don’t like, but in this case I did. I enjoyed it because they only hated one another because of these miscommunications and assumptions. Once they finally found themselves together and required to talk, they cleared some things up and realized they got along pretty well.
I’m going to keep this review short and sweet because that’s what this book was. It was sweet and realistic and I enjoyed it. It’s not my new favorite book in the world, but I had a fun time reading it.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.