Antonia’s Top Ten Tuesday: New to Me Authors

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. This week’s topic is New-to-Me Authors I Read in 2020 (If you didn’t read 10 new authors, that’s fine! Just do what you can.)

Rin Chupeco

Jen Deluca

Kristen Ciccarelli

Amal El Mohtar

Max Gladstone

I only read five new authors last year but I’m making it a priority to branch out more this year. What authors did you discover in 2020?

Amanda’s Favorite Audiobooks of 2020

Hi, lovelies! I read 85 audiobooks in 2020. Some of them were absolutely incredible and I knew I needed to make a separate list of favorite audiobooks so that I could share and recommend them to you all. Some of them may be on a list I’ve already posted or on one that’s coming later this month, but being on more than one of my lists is how you know it was just that good. Now, I am pretty pick about what kinds of audiobooks I like. I prefer narrators that do different voices for different characters. My favorite thing is full cast audiobooks. But I do sometimes find audiobooks that just have one narrator that does an incredible job telling the story. This list is a combination of those.

Mirage by Somaiya Daud

The Silvered Serpents by Roshani Chokshi

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

Do You Dream of Terra-Two? by Temi Oh

The Last 8 by Laura Pohl

The Final Six by Alexandra Monir

The Epic Crush of Genie Lo by F.C. Yee

You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson

Rules for Being a Girl by Candace Bushnell & Katie Cotugno

Aru Shah and the Tree of Wishes by Roshani Chokshi

Wanderers by Chuck Wendig

A Song Below Water by Bethany C. Morrow

The Gravity of Us by Phil Stamper

Internment by Samira Ahmed

Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo

Early Departures by Justin A. Reynolds

There we have it, friends. These are all of my favorite audiobooks that I listened to in 2020. Now, I did reread a few series via audio but I didn’t include those on here. What audiobooks did you listen to in 2020 that really blew you away?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Amanda’s Favorite Young Adult Books of 2020

Hey, lovelies! If you’re new here, welcome! We’re talking about my favorite books that I read in 2020 by age range. Today it’s young adult books that I read and really loved. There’s a whole mix of genres on this list that stuck with me for a variety of reasons. Now, in my last list I included some of the books that made my overall favorites list, but this one won’t. I have too many I want to add to this list so, check out my 10 favorites of 2020 to see the young adult titles not included on this list.

Early Departures by Justin A. Reynolds

There Will Come a Darkness by Katy Rose Pool

We Set the Dark on Fire by Tehlor Kay Mejia

The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi

The Ever Cruel Kingdom by Rin Chupeco

Furyborn by Claire Legrand

The Fell of the Dark by Caleb Roehrig

Today Tonight Tomorrow by Rachel Lynn Solomon

The Gravity of Us by Phil Stamper

Rules for Being a Girl by Candace Bushnell & Katie Cotugno

Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo

A Million Junes by Emily Henry

The Final Six by Alexandra Monir

Save the Date by Morgan Matson

For a Muse of Fire by Heidi Heilig

There you have it, fifteen young adult books that I loved so much I had to make this list for them. What young adult books made your favorites list this year?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Amanda’s Top Ten Tuesday – Books I Meant to Read in 2020

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each week we talk about our top ten with a different topic provided by Jana. This week’s topic is books that I meant to read in 2020, but didn’t get to.

The Bone Shard Daughter by Andrea Stewart

War Girls by Tochi Onyebuchi

Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Chosen Ones by Veronica Roth

The Ruin of Kings by Jenn Lyons

The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

Heart of Iron by Ashley Poston

A Deadly Education by Naomi Novik

Miss Meteor by Anna-Marie McLemore & Tehlor Kay Mejia

These are some books that I had on various seasonal TBRs and Readathon TBRs that I just didn’t end up reading. What books did you want to get to in 2020, but didn’t?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Antonia’s Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Meant to Read in 2020

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. This week’s topic is a Books I Meant to Read In 2020 but Didn’t Get To (You could take this opportunity to tell us what’s left on your seasonal TBRs from last year. Or books you were super excited about and then you didn’t get to them.)

To Sleep in A Sea of Stars by Christopher Pasolini

Seven Devils by Elizabeth May and Laura Lam

Rules For Being A Girl by Candace Bushnell and Katie Cotugno

Four Dead Queens by Astrid Scholte

The Bromance Book Club by Lydia Kay Adams

First Comes Scandal by Julia Quinn

The Invisible Life of Addie Larue by V. E. Schwartz

Would Like to Meet by Rachel Winters

Set Fire to the Gods by Sara Raasch and Kristen Simmons

The Hidden Oracle by Rick Riordan

These are some of the books on my 2020 TBR that I wasn’t able to get to? What books are still hanging around on your TBR this year?

Amanda’s Favorite Middle Grade Books of 2020

Hi, lovelies! As I said in my top ten favorite books of 2020 post (find that here), I’m going to have a few lists other than that one. Today’s list is my favorite middle-grade books that I read last year. These are not all only 2020 releases, just books I read in 2020. I cannot stop thinking about these books or they really touched me on an emotional level, which is why they’ve made this list. I do also want to mention that there may be repeats on this list from my first favorites post, but it’s just because I really loved them.

Paola Santiago and the River of Tears by Tehlor Kay Mejia

The Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan

Closer to Nowhere by Ellen Hopkins

Furthermore by Tahereh Mafi

Aru Shah and the Tree of Wishes by Roshani Chokshi

Tristan Strong Destroys the World by Kwame Mbalia

Ghost Squad by Claribel Ortega

Sal and Gabi Fix the Universe by Carlos Hernandez

Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World by Ashley Herring Blake

The Deceivers by Margaret Peterson Haddix

Looking at this list, I realize I’ve mostly just read all of the books from the Rick Riordan Presents publishing imprint. I do not have a problem with that at all because they’re amazing books and I would shout about them from the rooftops if I could. So, go to your local library, borrow them from a friend, buy the ebooks, however you like to get books, get these and read them.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Amanda’s 10 Favorite Books of 2020

Hello, lovelies! Today, as you can see from the title of this post, I am here to share with you all 10 of my favorite books that I read in 2020. I will be doing my favorites a bit differently than I did last year. Last year, I made a few lists of my favorite books organized by genre. This year, I’m going to make a few lists but they will be my favorites organized by age range. So, today’s post will be my top twenty favorite (but not in any specific order because I’m a creature filled with indecision), and then over the next few weeks I’ll have more posts with my favorite books for each age range (middle-grade, young adult, and adult) and maybe some based on format (like audiobooks and graphic novels). Let’s get into today’s post! I’ll be linking my reviews, if I have one, so feel free to click through and see my full (spoiler free!) review of my favorite books.

The Scapegracers by Hannah Abigail Clarke

The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow

A Song Below Water by Bethany C. Morrow

Paola Santiago and the River of Tears by Tehlor Kay Mejia

The Space Between Worlds by Micaiah Johnson

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

Girl, Serpent, Thorn by Melissa Bashardoust

Mirage by Somaiya Daud

You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson

The How & the Why by Cynthia Hand

These are my top ten favorite books of 2020. Now, these are not all 2020 releases, but I read them all in 2020. These are some of the books that I just can’t stop thinking about even though I read them forever ago. Also, these are by no means my only favorite books I read last year, which is why I have more lists coming for each age range that I read. What books were your favorites of 2020?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Amanda’s Top Ten Tuesday – Anticipated Releases for Early 2021

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each week we talk about our top ten with a different topic provided by Jana. This week’s topic is my anticipated releases for the first half of 2021.

19 January
This Will Be Funny Someday by Katie Henry

9 February
Game Changer by Neal Shusterman

9 February
The Iron Raven by Julie Kagawa

16 February
Blood Sworn by Scott Reintgen

9 March
Act Your Age, Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert

16 March
On This Unworthy Scaffold by Heidi Heilig

6 April
Aru Shah and the City of Gold by Roshani Chokshi

25 May
Legacy by Nora Roberts

1 June
A Chorus Rises by Bethany C. Morrow

22 June
Darling by K. Ancrum

This was such a hard list to make. But we have over 150 books on our 2021 anticipated releases list, which you can find here.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Antonia’s Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Books of 2020

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. This week’s topic is a list of my favorite books I read in 2020.

This Is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El Mohtar and Max Gladstone

Hideaway by Nora Roberts

The Last Namsara by Kristen Ciccarelli

Love, Jacaranda by Alex Flinn

Well Met by Jen Deluca

The Other Miss Bridgeston by Julia Quinn

Night of the Dragon by Julie Kagawa

A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor by Hank Green

The House of Earth and Blood by Sarah J. Maas.

The Never Tilting World by Rin Chupeco

What books were your favorite this year?

Blogmas Day Twenty-Two (Part Two): Antonia’s Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Want From Santa

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. This week’s topic is a list of books I’m hoping Santa brings.

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The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi
Aru Shah and the End of Time by Roshani Chokshi
The Awakening by Nora Roberts
The Ever Cruel Kingdom by Rin Chupeco
The Invisible Life of Addie Larue by V.E. Schwab
Star Daughter by Shveta Thakrar
Paola Santiago and the River of Tears by Tehlor Kay Mejia
Furyborn by Claire Legrand
The Right Swipe by Alisha Rai
Ruthless Gods by Emily A. Duncan

What books are you hoping to get this Christmas?

Blogtober Day Eight (Part Two): Antonia’s Top Ten Tuesday: Seasonal Freebie

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. This week’s topic is a holiday/ winter freebie. I’m going to list ten books that give me winter vibes; specifically winter settings.

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Bitterblue by Kristin Cashore

Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow by Jessica Day George

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

A Court of Frost and Starlight by Sarah J. Maas

Christmas Eve at Friday Harbor by Lisa Kleypas

Vision in White by Nora Roberts

To Light A Candle by Mercedes Lackey and James Mallory

The Gray Wolf Throne by Cinda Williams Chima

Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo

Black Rose by Nora Roberts

What are your favorite winter books?

Blogmas Day Eight (Part One): Amanda’s Top Ten Tuesday – Wintertime Favorites

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each week we talk about our top ten with a different topic provided by Jana. This week’s topic is Holiday/Seasonal Freebie (holiday books/covers/titles, wintry reads, snow on cover, cool color covers, etc. I’m going to talk about books I recommend to read in the wintertime curled up under a warm blanket with a nice cup of coffee or tea or cocoa.

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The Library of the Unwritten by A.J. Hackwith

The Hollow Places by T. Kingfisher

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

The Demon King by Cinda Williams Chima

The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow

The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune

For a Muse of Fire by Heidi Heilig

The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi

Dark Shores by Danielle L. Jensen

Air Awakens by Elise Kova

These are the books I highly recommend snuggling up and reading this winter. You won’t want to move until you’ve finished them. What did you choose for this seasonal freebie?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Blogmas Day Four: December & January Anticipated Releases

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Hey, friends! Let’s talk about new books! For Blogtober we did October releases that we’re excited about, so we thought we could do that again but with December releases. The only problem with this is that there weren’t very many for this list in December. We decided to also include January as there’s quite a few exciting releases in January.

The Cousins by Karen M. McManus – Release Date: December 1st, 2020

Admission by Julie Buxbaum – Release Date: December 1st, 2020

Black Canary: Breaking Silence by Alexandra Monir – Release Date: December 29th, 2020

City of the Plague God by Sarwat Chadda – Release Date: January 5th, 2021

Lore by Alexandra Bracken – Release Date: January 5th, 2021

Be Dazzled by Ryan La Sala – Release Date: January 5th, 2021

You Have a Match by Emma Lord – Release Date: January 5th, 2021

This Will Be Funny Someday by Katie Henry – Release Date: January 19th, 2021

The Ex Talk by Rachel Lynn Solomon – Release Date: January 26th, 2021

Unchosen by Kathryn Blair – Release Date: January 26th, 2021

These are the December and January book releases that we are excited about. Are there any new releases on your radar that we don’t have on our list?

#SciFiMonth: If You Liked This, Then Read That

#SciFiMonth: 1-30 November 2020
ARTWORK by Tithi Luadthong from 123RF.com.

Hey, lovelies! I did this sort of post for Blogtober and I thought it was so much fun to make, so I thought I would try it out for SciFi Month! Today I’m going to be giving book recommendations based on other books. These are all science fiction books that I enjoyed, but they vary in subgenre and age ranges. So, let’s get into my second edition of ‘if you liked this book, then try that one!

If you liked The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer then you should try Tarnished Are the Stars by Rosiee Thor. The first book in The Lunar Chronicles follows Cinder, a cyborg, in a cinderella retelling of sorts. She finds herself involved with Prince Kai and suddenly she’s involved in intergalactic politics. Tarnished Are the Stars follows Anna who is known as ‘the Technician.’ She has an illegal clockwork heart and she supplies other people with illegal technology. She meets the Commissioner’s son, Nathaniel, who is determined to turn Anna in to his father. But when Nathaniel’s betrothed, Eliza, comes to Earth Adjacent, the three of them might just bring down the local government. These books were both so great. They both follow unlikely heroes that are excellent mechanics and somehow end up in a plot to overthrow the government.

If you liked The Illuminae Files by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff then you might like The Themis Files by Sylvain Neuvel. The first book in the series, Illuminae, follows Katy and Ezra after their world has been invaded and they’re forced to flee. Katy is an excellent hacker and manages to figure out what’s going on despite being told nothing. But the only person that she thinks can help her happens to be her ex-boyfriend, Ezra. Sleeping Giants is the first book in the series. It follows Rose, first when she’s a child and finds a giant robot hand, and almost twenty years later she’s a physicist leading a top-secret team that is researching the hand she discovered as a child. I’ve connected these two books for one big reason, they’re both told in a mixed media format. The first book is told in a series of emails, video transcripts, IMs, interviews, and other sorts of documents. The second book is told in mostly interview format with an anonymous interviewer. There are also radio broadcast transcripts and audio journal entries. Both series are told in mixed media. I think they’re similar in another aspect with the way the series progress. All three books The Illuminae Files are following three different couples. All three books in The Themis Files have a significant time jump between each book. Both series are also highly recommended for their audiobook format.

If you liked American Royals by Katharine McGee then you should try The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal. American Royals is a reality tv sort of story that is set in modern day, but the twist is that George Washington was made the King of America after the revolution. The story follows his modern day descendants. The Calculating Stars is a bit different. It’s also an alternate reality story. In the 1950s a meteorite falls to the Earth and destroyed a significant amount of the east coast, including Washington, DC. This causes all sorts of environmental issues leading the people to look to the moon as an alternative to live on. We follow Elma York as she realizes that she wants to be on the space mission and not just a calculator for NASA. The common link between these two recommendations are that they are alternate reality stories. But they are also both very much stories that focus on women. Elma wants to be a female astronaut which is unheard of and Beatrice is going to be the first Queen of America.

If you liked Dry by Neal Shusterman & Jarrod Shusterman then you will probably like Internment by Samira Ahmed. Dry is a story about when California runs out of water. The drought has been an issue for a while, but the taps run dry and the world gets dystopian like very quickly. Internment is set in a near future potential reality where Layla and her parents are forced into an internment camp for Muslim Americans. Both stories are very dark. Dry is dark in a way where peoples survival instincts come out and how it would be to live in a world where it’s every person for themselves. The things people could do for the sake of survival is scary. Internment is a story about hate and how that hate can change the world as we know it. Both stories are filled with characters that aren’t ready to give up. Both stories had tears in my eyes and hope for a better world in my heart.

If you liked The Weight of the Stars by K. Ancrum you should try The Gravity of Us by Phil Stamper. The Weight of the Stars tells the story of Ryann who dreams of being an astronaut. She’s accepted her reality and that this dream isn’t likely to happen. Enter Alexandria, a loner that does everything she can to avoid Ryann’s offer of friendship. Despite this, Alexandra joins Ryann’s chaotic friendship. This is a slow burn romance that focuses on the characters, their dreams, and their growth. The Gravity of Us is about Cal, a successful seventeen-years-old journalist who is forced to move from Brooklyn to Houston because his father was selected for an important NASA mission. Life in Houston is completely different, but when he befriends a fellow astronaut’s son, things start to look up. Just a disclaimer, these are both a bit more contemporary than science fiction, but they both have characters who’s life surrounds people that are currently in space or are about to be in space. Plus I thought it would be okay to have one for those that like the idea of science fiction without most of the sci-fi stuff. These are both that. They both have queer romances and talk about heavy topics in thoughtful and meaningful ways. I loved them both very much.

If you liked Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff you will probably like The Disasters by M.K. England. The tagline for Aurora Rising is “They’re not the heroes we deserve. They’re just the ones we could find. Nobody panic.” It follows six misfits as they discover secrets that the government is hiding and do their best to save the universe. The Disasters doesn’t have the same tagline, but it could. “They may not be “Academy material,” and they may not get along, but they’re the only ones left to step up and fight.” This book has a cast of five diverse disaster children that are the only ones that know the Academy has been attacked by a terrorist group. They need to stop this group and spread the truth before they can do worse than just take over the Academy. Both stories are a found family group that need to stop a big bad from taking over the universe. Through social media I’ve heard that many people are disappointed in Aurora Rising and it’s sequel, which is why I made this comparison because everything I wanted from Aurora Rising is what I got from The Disasters.

If you liked The Sound of Stars by Alechia Dow you might like I Hope You Get This Message by Farah Naz Rishi. The Sound of Stars follows Ellie while she lives in New York City, which is a city controlled by aliens. When one of those aliens, MoRr1S (Morris), finds her hidden (and illegal) library he’s supposed to report her except he doesn’t. The two end up on a road trip, sharing music and books, on their way to try to save humanity. I Hope You Get This Message follows three characters, who are all doing what they need to in what they think may be their final week of life. Earth has received a message from another planet saying that they have one week before they end civilization. Jesse, Cate, and Adeem have only a week to right wrongs and face truths before the world ends. These books are different in the sense that the first had already been invaded by aliens and the second isn’t being invaded but seems to be an expirement of these aliens, one that has been decided a failure and needs to be terminated. The common factors of these books are roadtrips between people that don’t know one another very well, but end up with very strong relationships. Both stories are also filled with diverse and fascinating characters.

If you liked Dune by Frank Herbert you should try Mirage by Somaiya Daud. Dune follows Paul after his father takes him to an ‘inhospitable’ world where the only thing of value is the spice that is produced on this planet. When his family is betrayed, Paul and his mother set out into the desert with one goal, survive, and eventually return and retake the planet that should be under Paul’s rule. Mirage follows Amani after she’s kidnapped so that she can be the body double of the half-Vathek princess, Maram. The Vath have conquered Amani’s planet and with her new place within the palace she wants to see if she can find a way to free her people. I chose these two books because Dune is a really well known book that deals with overtaking planets, learning about the culture of said planet and then Paul trying to do better than those before him. But Mirage is all of those things with a strong female lead written by an author of color who drew from her own heritage. Mirage is an incredible story that more people should read. If you liked the concept of Dune but don’t want to read that huge book, Mirage is only 320 pages and every page is incredibly written, diverse, and filled with an incredible world.

If you liked Renegades by Marissa Meyer you might like The Extraordinaries by T.J. Klune. Renegades follows Nova (a villain) while she infiltrates Renegade Headquarters and tries to find weaknesses to bring them down. She lives in a world of prodigies, one much different from our own. Vengeance is her motivation, but things become less and less clear as the series progresses. The Extraordinaries follows Nick, a queer teen with ADHD who is one of the most popular fan fiction writers in the Extraordinary fandom. Nick idolizes one Extraordinary in particular and after he meets this hero, Nick decides he wants to make himself an Extraordinary. These stories are both in the superhero realm of science fiction. They different in the sense of the worlds they take place in. Renegades is in a world where it’s completely changed from our world while The Extraordinaries is mostly our world, but with a few rare individuals that have superpowers. But both stories follow characters that might not be on the best path. I really enjoyed both stories that were filled with interesting abilities and characters I couldn’t help but love.

If you liked Year One by Nora Roberts you will probably like The Fever King by Victoria Lee. Year One follows a cast of characters as the world ends via a sickness that spreads unbelievably fast and those that recover are left with gifts. There are some that are immune, but the world descends into chaos as the world as we know it ends. This cast of characters must figure out a new beginning now that the world has come to an end. In The Fever King, Noam lives in what used to be the U.S. He’s caught the sickness and is the sole survivor of his family. He’s also left with the gift of technopathy. Noam gets recruited into what’s basically a military of people that have survived the sickness and now have abilities. Noam joins with hopes to change the way the world has become. He wants to fight for what is right. Both of these stories deal with how the world can change once it ends. They both have the world ending with some sort of sickness and that sickness results with some people having special abilities. I really enjoyed them both.

I ended up finding way more books than I intended, but I was having too much fun and just sort of went with it. So, here you have it. Ten comparisons and twenty books total. Let me know if you’ve read any of these and agree or disagree with my pairings.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Amanda’s Top Ten Tuesday – Things I’m Thankful For

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each week we talk about our top ten with a different topic provided by Jana. This week’s topic is Thanksgiving/I’m Thankful for… Freebie. I’m going to list my favorite things about Thanksgiving.

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Friends and/or family getting together (I live far from most of my family, so it’s usually friends)

Sweet Potatoes, the way my step-mom makes them.

Pumpkin Pie

Cranberry Apple Crisp, the way my Aunt makes it.

Stuffing, duh.

Fall weather (all the pretty leaves!)

Cozy reading weather

Deviled eggs. I don’t know if this is a normal thanksgiving thing, but my step-mom always makes them as a before dinner snack and I love them so much.

Cranberry Apple Bread (it’s delicious trust me)

Texting/talking with friends. Many of my friends and I don’t talk as often now that I’m always busy with a two-year-old but around the holidays we usually reach out to one another and catch up. I love having these holiday check ins and having friends that are super understanding about my not great communication skills.

What did you choose for this weeks topic?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.