WWW Wednesday

Hey, bookworms! It’s that day of the week again where we participate in the wonderful bookish post that is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To play along just answer three questions to give an update about what you’re currently reading, going to read next, and have read recently.

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What are you currently reading?

Amanda- I’m currently reading The Ballad of Songbird of Snakes by Suzanne Collins and listening to the audiobook for The Great Alone by Kristen Hannah.

Antonia- I’m currently reading The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss.

What did you recently finish reading?

Amanda- I most recently finished reading The Deck of Omens by Christine Lynn Herman.

Antonia- I just finished The Last Namsara by Kristin Ciccarelli.

What do you think you will read next?

Amanda- I’m looking at my TBR shelf now and I’m thinking something fantasy next. Maybe one of N.K. Jemisin’s books.

Antonia- Next I’ll read Love, Jacaranda by Alex Flinn.

Thanks for reading. Let us know what you’re reading in the comments!

The Mall by Megan McCafferty

GoodReads Summary:
The year is 1991. Scrunchies, mixtapes and 90210 are, like, totally fresh. Cassie Worthy is psyched to spend the summer after graduation working at the Parkway Center Mall. In six weeks, she and her boyfriend head off to college in NYC to fulfill The Plan: higher education and happily ever after.
But you know what they say about the best laid plans…
Set entirely in a classic “monument to consumerism,” the novel follows Cassie as she finds friendship, love, and ultimately herself, in the most unexpected of places. Megan McCafferty, beloved New York Times bestselling author of the Jessica Darling series, takes readers on an epic trip back in time to The Mall.
The MallReview:
I was excited when NetGalley approved me for this book (in exchange for an honest review of course). I’m a 90’s kid, so I thought I was really going to love this book, but I very sadly did not. It was hard for me to place what exactly I didn’t like about this book. I read it fairly quickly. It was an easy book to binge. I loved the mystery of the treasure. I also loved Cassie’s journey of figuring herself out. But there was just something I didn’t love about this book.
After reading some GoodReads reviews, I figured it out. Many others had the same problem that I did. Apparently, this book was written in cooperation with an entertainment company. So, it’s not clear if the concept of this book came from them or if the book was mostly written by them. As the reviews on GoodReads said, this story was missing heart. And that was my problem. I don’t know how to explain what that means to me. But I just didn’t love this story. It was a fun read, but mostly forgettable. I didn’t hate it by any means, I just didn’t love it as much as I wanted to.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Antonia’s Top Ten Tuesday: Freebie

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. This week’s topic is a list of ten Freebie (This week you get to come up with your own TTT topic!) For this freebie, I’m going to reuse an old topic that I didn’t get a chance to do: Longest books I’ve ever read.

Acheron by Sherrilyn Kenyon – 728 pages

Breaking Dawn by Stephenie Meyer – 756 pages

The Witness by Nora Roberts – 757 pages

Winter by Marisa Meyer – 827 pages

Inheritance by Christopher Paolini – 849 pages

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon – 850 pages

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling – 870 pages

Kingdom of Ash by Sarah J. Maas – 984 pages

The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss – 994 pages

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas – 1276 pages

What really long books have you read? Thanks for reading!

The Worst Best Man by Mia Sosa

GoodReads Summary:
Critically acclaimed author Mia Sosa delivers a sassy, steamy enemies-to-lovers romantic comedy about a woman whose new job requires her to work side-by-side with the best man who ruined her wedding: her ex-fiancé’s infuriating, irritating, annoyingly handsome brother. Perfect for fans of Jasmine Guillory, Helen Hoang, and Sally Thorne!
A wedding planner left at the altar. Yeah, the irony isn’t lost on Carolina Santos, either. But despite that embarrassing blip from her past, Lina’s managed to make other people’s dreams come true as a top-tier wedding coordinator in DC. After impressing an influential guest, she’s offered an opportunity that could change her life. There’s just one hitch… she has to collaborate with the best (make that worst) man from her own failed nuptials.
Tired of living in his older brother’s shadow, marketing expert Max Hartley is determined to make his mark with a coveted hotel client looking to expand its brand. Then he learns he’ll be working with his brother’s whip-smart, stunning—absolutely off-limits—ex-fiancée. And she loathes him.
If they can survive the next few weeks and nail their presentation without killing each other, they’ll both come out ahead. Except Max has been public enemy number one ever since he encouraged his brother to jilt the bride, and Lina’s ready to dish out a little payback of her own.
But even the best laid plans can go awry, and soon Lina and Max discover animosity may not be the only emotion creating sparks between them. Still, this star-crossed couple can never be more than temporary playmates because Lina isn’t interested in falling in love and Max refuses to play runner-up to his brother ever again…
The Worst Best ManReview:
I picked this one up because as I’ve mentioned in many previous reviews that I’m on a romance kick. This is one that I’ve seen a ton of people talking about so I had to grab it when I saw it available as an eBook through my library.
I enjoyed this book for the most part. I liked the banter and familial aspects. The romance was interesting and believable. I loved how diverse it was and how Lina shares her culture with the people around her. This book definitely made me hungry. It also totally made me want to plan a wedding (which is silly because I’m already married.) I loved the competition aspect of the story as well. Lina is trying to get a job for a well-known hotel and help them add weddings to the many things they provide for their clientele.
I’m going to keep this review short because I don’t have all that much to say about this book. I enjoyed it, but I wasn’t totally comfortable with the whole falling in love with her ex-fiance’s brother concept. I get that Andrew’s the one that left her, but this was just a little unrealistic to me. I don’t know many people that would actually let this happen, let alone it ends up being a successful relationship. Despite this, the story was fun and entertaining.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black

GoodReads Summary:
Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.
Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.
At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.
Until one day, he does…
As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?
The Darkest Part of the ForestReview:
The Darkest Part of the Forest takes place in the same world as the Folk of the Air trilogy. Many were disappointed by the finale of that series and to those people I say, READ THIS BOOK RIGHT NOW. The Darkest Part of the Forest was everything I wanted from the Folk of the Air series. There were interesting and complex sibling relationships. There were romantic relationships that I was quickly invested in. Plus, there was all the fae drama that I loved from her other series, but more interesting.
The fae aspect of this story was so fascinating. This story takes place in the town of Fairfold where the fae come out to play with tourists. I loved this aspect of the story. The concept of magic in the world as I know it is so interesting to me. The fae in town don’t mess with the locals, only the tourists that come to see the horned boy in the glass coffin. The horned boy’s coffin is also the local’s party spot. This hit me in the high school feels because I totally partied in the woods during my high school years, so, I could totally see my friends in the party scenes with the horned boy.
When the coffin is found shattered and the horned boy awakes, life in Fairfold changes. I loved the relationship between Hazel and Ben. I really enjoyed getting to see their history. When they were children, they hunted fae with Ben using his musical ability and Hazel fighting them. There were some hard to read parts with these parts, but it just made the story that much better. Their relationship was so complicated and tangled, there were a lot of issues between them but I loved seeing them work through these issues and develop their relationships.
The romances were wonderful. I’m not going to specify who is with who because the wondering (for me) was a great part of the book. Both siblings find romance in these pages. Ben is gay and his romance was everything I wanted and more. The way his path led in this story was everything I wanted from Jude and Cardan. Hazel’s romance was also right up my alley. It was my favorite romance trope and I love how things turned out for them.
Overall, this book was so freaking good. I don’t know why more people haven’t read this. To all of the people that read and loved The Cruel Prince, please read this book because you will love this even more. The supporting characters were amazing. The mix of real-world and fae was great. I just loved everything about this book.

 

Quotes:

“Once, there was a girl who vowed she would save everyone in the world, but forgot herself.”

“Every child needs a tragedy to become truly interesting.”

“Down a path worn into the woods, past a stream and a hollowed-out log full of pill bugs and termites, was a glass coffin. It rested right on the ground, and in it slept a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives.”

“There don’t have to be first dates and second dates. We’re not normal. We can do this anyway you want. A relationship can be whatever you want it to be. We get to make this part up. We get to tell our own story.”

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Crave by Tracy Wolff

GoodReads Summary:
My whole world changed when I stepped inside the academy. Nothing is right about this place or the other students in it. Here I am, a mere mortal among gods…or monsters. I still can’t decide which of these warring factions I belong to, if I belong at all. I only know the one thing that unites them is their hatred of me.
Then there’s Jaxon Vega. A vampire with deadly secrets who hasn’t felt anything for a hundred years. But there’s something about him that calls to me, something broken in him that somehow fits with what’s broken in me.
Which could spell death for us all.
Because Jaxon walled himself off for a reason. And now someone wants to wake a sleeping monster, and I’m wondering if I was brought here intentionally—as the bait.
Crave (Crave, #1)Review:
Everyone and their brother have been talking about this book. So, of course, I was curious to see what the hype was about. Sadly, I didn’t love this. It was definitely fun and it was definitely entertaining, but it wasn’t anything to write home about.
We’re following Grace as she is forced to move to Alaska and attend the boarding school that her Uncle is the headmaster of. Her parents died in a car crash and she’s feeling a bit lost. But she has her cousin, Macy, and I loved their relationship. They quickly become friends, as they share a room. The only thing that I didn’t like about their relationship was that Macy was a terrible liar. Grace has found herself in a school full of supernatural creatures except she doesn’t know that fact. So, Macy lies to her at the direction of her father. Macy is a terrible liar and I really don’t understand how Grace didn’t see right through her. That was my biggest issue with this book. It was so glaringly obvious that Grace was surrounded by supernaturals but somehow, she didn’t see it. I couldn’t tell if the author made it so obvious on purpose or not, but I didn’t like that.
Aside from that part, I thought the creativity of the supernatural creatures in this story was interesting. A school filled with witches, shapeshifting wolves and dragons, and vampires. This is the kind of thing I live for. I loved the politics between the species and the drama, oh the high school drama. The drama and politics were so entertaining. This was the part that really kept the story going.
Overall, I wasn’t blown away by this book but it was definitely a fun read. I will probably read the second book but this one won’t be making my favorites list.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Aru Shah and the Tree of Wishes by Roshani Chokshi

GoodReads Summary:
War between the devas and the demons is imminent, and the Otherworld is on high alert. When intelligence from the human world reveals that the Sleeper is holding a powerful clairvoyant and her sister captive, 14-year-old Aru and her friends launch a search-and-rescue mission. The captives, a pair of twins, turn out to be the newest Pandava sisters, though, according to a prophecy, one sister is not true.
During the celebration of Holi, the heavenly attendants stage a massage PR rebranding campaign to convince everyone that the Pandavas are to be trusted. As much as Aru relishes the attention, she fears that she is destined to bring destruction to her sisters, as the Sleeper has predicted. Aru believes that the only way to prove her reputation is to find the Kalpavriksha, the wish-granting tree that came out of the Ocean of Milk when it was churned. If she can reach it before the Sleeper, perhaps she can turn everything around with one wish.
Careful what you wish for, Aru…
Aru Shah and the Tree of Wishes (Pandava Quartet #3)Review:
I have a fierce love for this series. I love Aru Shah with my whole heart. So, I’m not sure how I’m going to explain my feelings for this book. I might just keep this short and tell you to read it a hundred times and then end it. Just kidding.
We’re following Aru, Mini, and Brynn as their trying to save the world from the Sleeper. There’s also Aidan and Rudy that tag along with the girls. I love this found family so much. We find two new Pandava sisters at the start of this story. Twins named Sheela and Nikita, who have very interesting abilities. I loved how quickly the three pull Sheela and Nikita into their loving arms. I love that even though most of them have families to go back to that are loving and supportive, these sisters (and Aidan and Rudy) have made a family of their own. The found family aspect of this story was so wonderful.
The stakes have never been higher for this group. They’ve failed a few minor missions and are feeling lower than low. So, they take off on their own without permission from the higher-ups. I loved the nonstop action of the story, even while they were just traveling from one task to the next, they were met with challenges that they faced bravely and always together.
Overall, I adored this story just like all the previous books. I am already dying for the next installment to know what happens next. The friendships are wonderful, the writing is amazing. I adore the world and the mythology that this story centers around. I love everything about this book and the rest of the series. If you haven’t read it yet you’re really missing out.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Year They Fell by David Kreizman

GoodReads Summary:
When a horrible tragedy unites five very different high school seniors, they discover the worst moment of your life can help determine who you really are in the powerful YA novel, The Year They Fell.
Josie, Jack, Archie, Harrison, and Dayana were inseparable as preschoolers. But that was before high school, before parties and football and getting into the right college. Now, as senior year approaches, they’re basically strangers to each other.
Until they’re pulled back together when their parents die in a plane crash. These former friends are suddenly on their own. And they’re the only people who can really understand how that feels.
To survive, the group must face the issues that drove them apart, reveal secrets they’ve kept since childhood, and discover who they’re meant to be. And in the face of public scrutiny, they’ll confront mysteries their parents left behind–betrayals that threaten to break the friendships apart again.
A new family is forged in this heartbreaking, funny, and surprising book from award-winning storyteller David Kreizman. It’s a deeply felt, complex journey into adulthood, exploring issues of grief, sexual assault, racism, and trauma.
The Year They FellReview:
I was intrigued by the synopsis of this book when I was researching 2019 releases last year. The cover is what pulled me in first because it’s stunning, but then the concept of the story is when I knew I had to read it.
The Year They Fell was devastating, but also somehow uplifting. We follow ‘the sunnies’ who are a group of friends that all went to preschool together. They drifted apart over the years and are no longer really friends at all. Their parents are all still friends though, and when they’re headed to vacation together, their plane crashes killing everyone that was on it. Only Daya’s parents survive because they never made it on the plane.
These five kids are going through something terrible, and you’d think they’d try to do it together since they’re all dealing with the same thing, but that’s not really how it happens. I liked that their story wasn’t predictable. I liked that it was different and heart-wrenching.
Each character gets their own perspective, which is tough to do and be able to give them each a distinct and different personality and voice. I think the author did well with this with one exception. Archie and Harrison. I had a hard time remembering which was which. One was an only child and had severe anxiety, thought all of them were anxious at one point or another. The other was adopted and had a younger brother. Both were a little nerdy. I liked all of the characters. I liked the journey from who they had become into who they were going to be now after this devastating loss.
Overall, this story was wonderfully diverse. There were all sorts of different relationship dynamics at play and I loved them all, friendships and romances. I will definitely be reading more by this author in the future.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

WWW Wednesday

Hey, bookworms! It’s that day of the week again where we participate in the wonderful bookish post that is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To play along just answer three questions to give an update about what you’re currently reading, going to read next, and have read recently.

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What are you currently reading?

Amanda- I’m currently reading A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor by Hank Green. I’m also listening to the audiobook for Burn Our Bodies Down by Rory Power (it’s incredible. This narrator is amazing and the story is perfect for spooky season.)

Antonia- I’m currently reading The Last Namsara by Kristen Cicarelli.

What did you recently finish reading?

Amanda- I most recently finished Girl, Serpent, Thorn by Melissa Bashardoust.

Antonia- I most recently finished Well Met by Jen DeLuca.

What do you think you will read next?

Amanda- I have no idea what I’m going to read next. I just got some books for me birthday and I’m thoroughly overwhelmed.

Antonia- I’m not sure what I’ll read next.

Thanks for reading. Let us know what you’re reading in the comments!

Amanda’s Top Ten Tuesday – Book Festivals

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each week we talk about our top ten with a different topic provided by Jana. This week’s topic is Book Events/Festivals I’d Love to Go to Someday. This is going to be a short one for me because there’s only a few I’d like to go to.

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BookCon (in New York). I had serious FOMO last year when I saw all my friends at this event last year. I’d like to go eventually, but obviously, that won’t happen this year.

YallWest I love the west coast and I’d love to attend this one.

ALA Conference I could have gone to this one last year and I’m sad that I didn’t.

Baltimore Book Festival is one I missed last year too. But I’m hoping it will still happen for 2020.

Apollycon is run by one of my favorite authors and I keep convincing myself not to go because of the ticket prices.

These are the book festivals I’d love to go to. I’m sure there are more I’d like to go to, but these are the well-known ones. Which ones are on your list?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

 

 

 

Artemis by Andy Weir

GoodReads Summary:
Jazz Bashara is a criminal.
Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you’re not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you’ve got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent.
Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down. But pulling off the impossible is just the start of her problems, as she learns that she’s stepped square into a conspiracy for control of Artemis itself—and that now, her only chance at survival lies in a gambit even riskier than the first.
ArtemisReview:
After reading and loving The Martian, I was really excited to pick up the other Andy Weir book I already owned. I’m glad I’ve finally read Weir’s books that I own because I loved them both.
We follow Jazz, who is a criminal. She’s smuggling things into her home on the moon when the opportunity of a lifetime arises. She can make a million slugs off one job, though it’s a rather dangerous one. Murphy’s Law is in full effect, even on the moon. Anything that could have gone wrong for Jazz, did. I loved Jazz as a character. We get her backstory in bits and pieces. There were emails from her pen pal on Earth and we learn a lot from him, which I really liked. I thought the emails were an interesting way to give us more information. Jazz was a real firecracker. She’s sassy, says what’s on her find, even if it’s vulgar and completely inappropriate. I totally loved it.
The plot of this book took a little while to get to. At first, we’re led to believe that the plot is going to center on Jazz doing this job and what will happen after she succeeds. But there ends up being so much more to the story. There are some murders, a bit of chloroform, and a whole lot of action.
Overall, I really loved this book. It was sassy and unapologetic about that sassiness. There was action and adventure, friendship and love, and of course, walking on the moon. I absolutely look forward to reading more of Andy Weir’s writing.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Heir Affair by Heather Cocks & Jessica Morgan

GoodReads Summary:
Making it up the aisle was the easy part: After marrying the heir to the throne, Rebecca “Bex” Porter must survive her own scandals as she adjusts to life in the glamorous British royal family, in this “highly anticipated” follow-up to The Royal We, the “fun and dishy” bestseller and NYT Summer Reading List pick inspired by Will and Kate’s romance (People).
After a scandalous secret turns their fairy-tale wedding into a nightmare, Rebecca “Bex” Porter and her husband Prince Nicholas are in self-imposed exile. The public is angry. The Queen is even angrier. And the press is salivating. Cutting themselves off from friends and family, and escaping the world’s judgmental eyes, feels like the best way to protect their fragile, all-consuming romance.
But when a crisis forces the new Duke and Duchess back to London, the Band-Aid they’d placed over their problems starts to peel at the edges. Now, as old family secrets and new ones threaten to derail her new royal life, Bex has to face the emotional wreckage she and Nick left behind: with the Queen, with the world, and with Nick’s brother Freddie, whose sins may not be so easily forgotten — nor forgiven.
The Heir Affair (Royal We, #2)Review:
Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for providing me this eARC in exchange for an honest review. The issues I had with this book were much the same as the ones I had with the first book. It was entirely too long. This was an almost 500-page book that just didn’t need to be. I wanted a fun royalty romance, but that’s not at all that this was. This book made me cry several times. It was heartbreaking and sad, but also full of friends and family and so much love. I loved the relationships. They’re complex and messy like most real relationships are. I think that’s what I liked most about this book. The relationships, though most aren’t anything like what royalty must deal with, had real and serious problems.
This book covered real issues like miscarriages and infertility, which I really liked. I’ve never dealt with either of these, but from an outside perspective, I thought they were handled well. I thought they were thoughtful and full of emotion. I cried several times while reading this story.
Overall, while the story was long, there were so many different and interesting plotlines that I was engaged and entertained for the whole story. I enjoyed this one more than I did the first book, but I still think it was too long.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Royal We by Heather Cocks & Jessica Morgan

GoodReads Summary:
American Rebecca Porter was never one for fairy tales. Her twin sister, Lacey, has always been the romantic who fantasized about glamour and royalty, fame and fortune. Yet it’s Bex who seeks adventure at Oxford and finds herself living down the hall from Prince Nicholas, Great Britain’s future king. And when Bex can’t resist falling for Nick, the person behind the prince, it propels her into a world she did not expect to inhabit, under a spotlight she is not prepared to face.
Dating Nick immerses Bex in ritzy society, dazzling ski trips, and dinners at Kensington Palace with him and his charming, troublesome brother, Freddie. But the relationship also comes with unimaginable baggage: hysterical tabloids, Nick’s sparkling and far more suitable ex-girlfriends, and a royal family whose private life is much thornier and more tragic than anyone on the outside knows. The pressures are almost too much to bear, as Bex struggles to reconcile the man she loves with the monarch he’s fated to become.
Which is how she gets into trouble.
Now, on the eve of the wedding of the century, Bex is faced with whether everything she’s sacrificed for love-her career, her home, her family, maybe even herself-will have been for nothing.
The Royal We (Royal We, #1)Review:
This book was entirely too long. Honestly, the only reason I read it at all was that I made the mistake of a late-night NetGalley request binge and didn’t realize that this book existed when I requested its sequel.
I didn’t hate this book it was just way too long. I enjoyed parts of it and others just seemed completely unneeded. While I did really liked Nick and Bex together, I don’t think we needed to follow eight years of their lives.
Usually, when I don’t like a book I have so much to say why I didn’t like it. But that’s not the case this time. I don’t know why I didn’t like this aside from the fact that there was so much to the story that could have been taken out.
There were some things I did like. I did find myself invested in Bex and Nick’s relationship. I also really loved their friend group. I loved that they included Bex into their circle so easily. The characters were the best part of this story. The drama that surrounds these characters was nothing short of ridiculous. I get that Nick is the future king, but I was over it after they graduated college. As for Bex’s twin sister Lacey, I loved her at first but quickly grew to hate her. I don’t understand how a sibling could be so selfish.
Overall, this story was very long but entertaining. I liked the antics of the characters in college, but as they grew older it got a little played out. I think this could have been a really fun book had it been a bit shorter.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Would Like to Meet by Rachel Winters

GoodReads Summary:
After seven years as an assistant, 29-year-old Evie Summers is ready to finally get the promotion she deserves. But now the TV and film agency she’s been running behind the scenes is in trouble, and Evie will lose her job unless she can convince the agency’s biggest and most arrogant client, Ezra Chester, to finish writing the script for a Hollywood romantic comedy.
The catch? Ezra is suffering from writer’s block–and he’ll only put pen to paper if singleton Evie can prove to him that you can fall in love like they do in the movies. With the future of the agency in jeopardy, Evie embarks on a mission to meet a man the way Sally met Harry or Hugh Grant met Julia Roberts.
But in the course of testing out the meet-cute scenes from classic romantic comedies IRL, not only will Evie encounter one humiliating situation after another, but she’ll have to confront the romantic past that soured her on love. In a novel as hilarious as it is heartwarming, debut author Rachel Winters proves that sometimes real life is better than the movies–and that the best kind of meet-cutes happen when you least expect them.
Would Like to MeetReview:
This book pulled me in with its cover. I was very happy that I liked the book inside as much as I like the cover. I thought the whole concept of the book was so cute. I only liked Evie most of the time with this book. She really wasn’t a very good friend and that really annoyed me. But her friends were incredibly forgiving and I liked them a lot. They were great supporting characters and added excellent banter to the story. But Evie was not the friend she should have been to them. I think that was in part because she put so much of her time and effort into her job that was completely not worth said time and effort. I was a little annoyed at times that she neglected literally everything else in her life for such a crappy job. Now, on a more positive note. I had so much fun with the meet-cutes that Evie had to do. They were taken right out of some great romantic comedy movies and they were definitely one of the better parts of this book.
I really hated Ezra. He was a huge asshole and I just really hated him. He was the stereotype of people in the movie industry and I totally predicted what he was doing with the stories of Evie’s meet-cutes like right away. I hated him, and yet, I still sort of believed him when he pulls the crap he pulls in this book. This was the part where I almost DNF’d this one. But everything came around to exactly where I wanted it to be in the end.
Overall, I really enjoyed this book. Evie was interesting and annoying, but also really learned a lot about herself and how to stand up for herself. I really liked the outcome of this story. I was really happy with the conclusion and it was a funny and entertaining read.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

GoodReads Summary:
A skilled painter must stand up to the ancient power of the faerie courts— even as she falls in love with a faerie prince—in this gorgeous debut novel.
Isobel is a prodigy portrait artist with a dangerous set of clients: the sinister fair folk, immortal creatures who cannot bake bread, weave cloth, or put a pen to paper without crumbling to dust. They crave human Craft with a terrible thirst, and Isobel’s paintings are highly prized. But when she receives her first royal patron—Rook, the autumn prince—she makes a terrible mistake. She paints mortal sorrow in his eyes—a weakness that could cost him his life.
Furious and devastated, Rook spirits her away to the autumnlands to stand trial for her crime. Waylaid by the Wild Hunt’s ghostly hounds, the tainted influence of the Alder King, and hideous monsters risen from barrow mounds, Isobel and Rook depend on one another for survival. Their alliance blossoms into trust, then love—and that love violates the fair folks’ ruthless laws. Now both of their lives are forfeit, unless Isobel can use her skill as an artist to fight the fairy courts. Because secretly, her Craft represents a threat the fair folk have never faced in all the millennia of their unchanging lives: for the first time, her portraits have the power to make them feel.
An Enchantment of RavensReview:
Absolutely everyone in the book community raves about this book. So, after reading her other novel (Sorcery of Thorns) and really enjoying it, I thought I’d finally give this book a try. I liked this book well enough.
I thought the characters were interesting. I liked that Isobel absolutely did not want to become a faerie. I think so many books are out there where the main character is human but wants to be anything but. So, Isobel is one of the few that doesn’t want that for herself, even after she fell in love with the autumn prince. I really thought it was interesting.
Sadly, I didn’t feel like I really connected with the characters as much as I could have. I liked them all well enough and I liked the romance well enough, but I wasn’t overly invested. I was happy with the overall outcome and things were exciting and action-filled, but I just wasn’t super attached to the story or the characters.
Overall, this book was fun. I enjoyed it even though I didn’t love it. I can completely understand why so many people love it, but I just wasn’t as invested in the story or characters as much as I wanted to be. I do also have to mention that the writing in this book was absolutely stunning. It was beautiful without being overly flowery. That was definitely one of my favorite things.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.