Lobizona by Romina Garber

GoodReads Summary:
Some people ARE illegal.
Lobizonas do NOT exist.
Both of these statements are false.
Manuela Azul has been crammed into an existence that feels too small for her. As an undocumented immigrant who’s on the run from her father’s Argentine crime-family, Manu is confined to a small apartment and a small life in Miami, Florida.
Until Manu’s protective bubble is shattered.
Her surrogate grandmother is attacked, lifelong lies are exposed, and her mother is arrested by ICE. Without a home, without answers, and finally without shackles, Manu investigates the only clue she has about her past–a mysterious “Z” emblem—which leads her to a secret world buried within our own. A world connected to her dead father and his criminal past. A world straight out of Argentine folklore, where the seventh consecutive daughter is born a bruja and the seventh consecutive son is a lobizón, a werewolf. A world where her unusual eyes allow her to belong.
As Manu uncovers her own story and traces her real heritage all the way back to a cursed city in Argentina, she learns it’s not just her U.S. residency that’s illegal…it’s her entire existence.
Lobizona (Wolves of No World, #1)Review:
What a wild ride this story was. Thank you to NetGalley and Alexis Neuville with St. Martin’s Press for providing me this eARC in exchange for an honest review.
I completely fell in love with this story within the first chapter. Manu’s struggle of being undocumented in the U.S. was heartbreaking. It’s something that happens to people every single day in this country and it’s absolutely horrible. Manu struggles with this, but loves her mother and respects her mother’s wishes. I loved Manu’s relationship with her mother. They were very close, despite the secrets between them. I was a little sad we didn’t get to see them together after they were separated when ICE took Manu’s mother away. But their love for one another was so obvious, it warmed my heart.
After ICE takes Manu’s mother, Manu finds herself in a world that was supposed to only be a myth. She lies her way into a school for Septimus. After becoming roommates with the headmistress’s daughter, Cata. Cata’s best friend, Saysa, decides Manu is going to be in their friend group. Saysa’s brother, Tiago (who I couldn’t figure out for way too long if he was Saysa’s brother or Cata’s brother) is a part of that group too. He’s the alpha of the pack and takes Manu under his wing. This romance was clear from the start and I really didn’t care for it because at their school everyone knows that Tiago and Cata are end game (but we find out some things that made this untrue and made me okay with their relationship). Though things weren’t kittens and rainbows when Manu first arrived, the four of them developed and really solid relationship, and I absolutely loved it. I loved that Manu finally felt like she had found the place she belonged. Sadly, this didn’t last long before she learned that once again, she was something that wasn’t supposed to exist, wasn’t allowed. I really liked that this book point blank discussed that immigration issues within the U.S. but it also talks about the struggle within a fantastical world. The world of the Septimus is a backward one. Men are werewolves and women are witches, there’s no room for discussion of changing these gender roles what so ever. Those in charge of Septimus are very strict in their thinking and the last person that tried to change the ways of the Septimus was Manu’s father, who Manu believed to be dead until she heard the rumors at her new school. I really liked the full circle of Manu trying to become the change right where her father left off.
Many people had issues with the fantasy world, but I really loved it. I really loved the comparison to Harry Potter and that the author had Manu be a fierce lover of the story so that Manu made the comparisons before the reader could. I thought it was an interesting world, hidden within the world we know today.
Overall, this book was heartbreaking but also incredibly fun. The found family was so wonderful, but there were also strong family values and I loved those too. The conversation this story brings to the table is a hard one but a necessary one. I really hope that so many other people will enjoy this book as much as I did.

Quotes:

“Deep down, we would rather be dreaming than awake.”

“You’re the spark we’re been waiting for—if you ignite, we will fan your flames. Otherwise, you’ll be alone in the dark forever.”

“But why settle for being a son of the system, when you can be the mother of a movement?”

“Plant your new garden with seeds of equality, water it with tolerance and empathy, and warm it with the temperate heat of truth.”

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Gilded Wolves by Roshani Chokshi

GoodReads Summary:
It’s 1889. The city is on the cusp of industry and power, and the Exposition Universelle has breathed new life into the streets and dredged up ancient secrets. Here, no one keeps tabs on dark truths better than treasure-hunter and wealthy hotelier Séverin Montagnet-Alarie. When the elite, ever-powerful Order of Babel coerces him to help them on a mission, Séverin is offered a treasure that he never imagined: his true inheritance.
To hunt down the ancient artifact the Order seeks, Séverin calls upon a band of unlikely experts: An engineer with a debt to pay. A historian banished from his home. A dancer with a sinister past. And a brother in arms if not blood.
Together, they will join Séverin as he explores the dark, glittering heart of Paris. What they find might change the course of history–but only if they can stay alive.
The Gilded Wolves (The Gilded Wolves, #1)Review:
How am I supposed to explain how much I loved this book? I wasn’t going to read this because of all of the negative or average reviews. All I have to say is, what is wrong with you people?? This book has been (wrongly) compared to Six of Crows. I slightly understand the comparison, but this story was so different.
We follow several different characters who all have different goals, but they’ve become a family of sorts and I loved every single one of them. I’ll start with Severin. He’s our damaged boy. I adored him. He’s supposed to have inherited his parent’s ring and become the patriarch of his family, but that right was stolen from him. His goal is to change that and reinstate his family, to become the patriarch that he was always supposed to be. After his parents died and his birthright was stolen from him, he was moved from home to home until he came into his monetary inheritance. I really liked the bits and pieces we got about each of his foster fathers. He also has a brother, Tristan.
Tristan is an awkward nerdy kid and I freaking loved him. He has this horrifying pet spider that he loves dearly. I don’t like spiders, but I loved Tristan. He’s like the little brother of everyone in the group. I adored how much everyone loves him. He’s a sweet little bean and I would die for him.
Laila is from India. She’s a dancer and loves to bake. That’s my kind of lady. She has an interesting history that I won’t specify because I thought learning about her was a part of the journey that is this book. She has a really interesting ability that is to be able to see the history of any object. I thought this was really cool, but also, I’m still curious about whether or not she can do the same with living things. Laila’s goal is to find a book that helped create her. I’m very intrigued by this book and I think it has something to do with the events of the next book.
Enrique is biracial (Filipino and Spanish). He’s a historian that loves to learn about the past. I thought his internal struggle with appearing more Spanish than Filipino was really interesting. I really thought he brought an interesting point of view to the story. He’s also bisexual, though the word is never used he says that he’s interested in both men and women. I really liked Enrique. He was the comedic relief of this friend group and I’m always a sucker for the funny guy. I also totally ship him with Zofia.
Zofia was a little science nerd and I love her. She’s Jewish which I thought was nice because I don’t see all that much representation for Jewish people out there. She’s also Polish and moved away from her sister to go to school. I believe that Zofia is somewhere on the Autism spectrum but I don’t know whether that’s been confirmed anywhere. She has issues with certain social cues, clothing materials, and I loved her so much. She’s incredibly smart and is the mad scientist and mathematician of the bunch. She loves to create but was not treated well when she tried to go to traditional schools.
Then there’s Hypnos, who isn’t a part of this found family at the beginning of the story. He manages to worm his way in though. I didn’t know whether or not we could trust him, but I grew to love him. He’s the patriarch of one of the last two recognized Houses. He hires the group to steal something from the other House. Obviously shit hits the fan and nothing goes as planned. I liked Hypnos. He was flirty and fun, but never quite trustworthy for most of the story. I’m definitely interested to see where his story goes in the next book.
Overall, I adored this book. I love Roshani’s writing. It’s just absolutely beautiful. She built a fascinating world with characters I would die for. Please read this book right now.

Quotes:

“Nothing but a symbol? People die for symbols. People have hope because of symbols. They’re not just lines. They’re histories, cultures, traditions, given shape.”

“Make yourself a myth and live within it, so that you belong to no one but yourself.”

“Her mother’s voice rang in her ears: ‘Don’t capture their hearts. Steal their imagination. It’s far more useful.”

“I don’t want to be their equal. I don’t want them to look us in the eye. I want them to look away, to blink harshly, as if they’d stared at the sun itself. I don’t want them standing across from us. I want them kneeling.”

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

 

Amanda’s July Wrap Up

Hello, lovelies! We are at the end of another month. What is up with this year? the first few months felt like a million years and now it feels like time is going by at hyperspeed. I had a bit of a slower month in July. I’ve finally found some new tv shows to get into and that’s definitely taken away from my reading time.

Physical Books
Sal and Gabi Fix the Universe by Carlos Hernandez
The Simple Wild by K.A. Tucker
Dune by Frank Herbert
Wild at Heart by K.A. Tucker
The Wicked + the Divine, Vol. 4: Rising Action by Keiron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, & Matt Wilson
What I Like About You by Marisa Kanter
The Roanoke Girls by Amy Engel
A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor by Hank Green
Wild Blue Wonder by Carlie Sorosiak
When the Sky Fell on Splendor by Emily Henry
The Deck of Omens by Christine Lynn Herman

eBooks
As the Shadow Rises by Katy Rose Pool
We Set the Dark on Fire by Tehlor Kay Mejia
Lifestyles of Gods and Monsters by Emily Roberson

Audiobooks
The Sword of Summer by Rick Riordan
Girl, Serpent, Thorn by Melissa Bashardoust
Burn Our Bodies Down by Rory Power
Eve of Man by Giovanna Fletcher & Tom Fletcher
The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah

These are all of the books I read in July! I managed to pick up a few 2020 releases that I was really excited about and a few backlist books too. What did you read this month?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Amanda’s July Graphic Novel Mini-Reviews

Hey, lovelies! It’s been a bit since I’ve picked up any of my graphic novels, but I’m determined to finally finish The Wicked + the Divine soon.

The Wicked + the Divine, Vol 4. Rising Action by Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, Matthew Wilson, & Clayton Cowles

As I said above, it’s been a bit since I’ve read any of my graphic novels, so jumping back into this series was a bit confusing. But I would like to point out that because I like this series so much I remember most of the bigger details from the first three volumes. I also thing that this volume did a better job at giving some back story, or at least showing us some things that we assumed but didn’t actually get to see. I really enjoyed Rising Action. It was full of well, action. But it also brought the Gods together and I thought that was really cool. I’m definitely interested to see where the story will go next (especially with how Persephone ended this book).

I was hoping to read a few more volumes in this series but only managed the one. I got a bunch of new novels for my birthday and became a bit distracted.

The Governess Game by Tessa Dare

GoodReads Summary:
The accidental governess.
After her livelihood slips through her fingers, Alexandra Mountbatten takes on an impossible post: transforming a pair of wild orphans into proper young ladies. However, the girls don’t need discipline. They need a loving home. Try telling that to their guardian, Chase Reynaud: duke’s heir in the streets and devil in the sheets. The ladies of London have tried—and failed—to make him settle down. Somehow, Alexandra must reach his heart… without risking her own.
The infamous rake.
Like any self-respecting libertine, Chase lives by one rule: no attachments. When a stubborn little governess tries to reform him, he decides to give her an education—in pleasure. That should prove he can’t be tamed. But Alexandra is more than he bargained for: clever, perceptive, passionate. She refuses to see him as a lost cause. Soon the walls around Chase’s heart are crumbling… and he’s in danger of falling, hard.
The Governess Game (Girl Meets Duke, #2)Review:
This story was so much fun. I definitely liked the first book in this series better, but The Governess Game was still really good.
We follow Alex as she’s somehow hired by Chase as a governess to the two girls that are his wards. The girls were my favorite part. Rosamund and Daisy have been passed around so many homes, they really just want someone to love them. Daisy kills her doll, Millicent, every day. So, most mornings start with Millicent’s funeral. This is what had me sold on Chase early in the story. Every day he gives Millicent a wonderful eulogy, and it’s clear that he cares for these girls even if he doesn’t want to admit it.
I loved the relationship between Chase and Alex too. Alex pushes him and even though he’s going to be a Duke she doesn’t pull any punches. She tells it like it is and doesn’t let him give her any crap. I really loved her effect on Chase.
Overall, this story was fun and sweet, but also has some really great sex scenes. There were some great space scenes where Alex is searching the stars. These characters work on conquering their fears. The growth was wonderful and I just really enjoyed this one.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

WWW Wednesday

Hey, bookworms! It’s that day of the week again where we participate in the wonderful bookish post that is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To play along just answer three questions to give an update about what you’re currently reading, going to read next, and have read recently.

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What are you currently reading?

Amanda- I’m currently reading The Ballad of Songbird of Snakes by Suzanne Collins and listening to the audiobook for The Great Alone by Kristen Hannah.

Antonia- I’m currently reading The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss.

What did you recently finish reading?

Amanda- I most recently finished reading The Deck of Omens by Christine Lynn Herman.

Antonia- I just finished The Last Namsara by Kristin Ciccarelli.

What do you think you will read next?

Amanda- I’m looking at my TBR shelf now and I’m thinking something fantasy next. Maybe one of N.K. Jemisin’s books.

Antonia- Next I’ll read Love, Jacaranda by Alex Flinn.

Thanks for reading. Let us know what you’re reading in the comments!

The Mall by Megan McCafferty

GoodReads Summary:
The year is 1991. Scrunchies, mixtapes and 90210 are, like, totally fresh. Cassie Worthy is psyched to spend the summer after graduation working at the Parkway Center Mall. In six weeks, she and her boyfriend head off to college in NYC to fulfill The Plan: higher education and happily ever after.
But you know what they say about the best laid plans…
Set entirely in a classic “monument to consumerism,” the novel follows Cassie as she finds friendship, love, and ultimately herself, in the most unexpected of places. Megan McCafferty, beloved New York Times bestselling author of the Jessica Darling series, takes readers on an epic trip back in time to The Mall.
The MallReview:
I was excited when NetGalley approved me for this book (in exchange for an honest review of course). I’m a 90’s kid, so I thought I was really going to love this book, but I very sadly did not. It was hard for me to place what exactly I didn’t like about this book. I read it fairly quickly. It was an easy book to binge. I loved the mystery of the treasure. I also loved Cassie’s journey of figuring herself out. But there was just something I didn’t love about this book.
After reading some GoodReads reviews, I figured it out. Many others had the same problem that I did. Apparently, this book was written in cooperation with an entertainment company. So, it’s not clear if the concept of this book came from them or if the book was mostly written by them. As the reviews on GoodReads said, this story was missing heart. And that was my problem. I don’t know how to explain what that means to me. But I just didn’t love this story. It was a fun read, but mostly forgettable. I didn’t hate it by any means, I just didn’t love it as much as I wanted to.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Antonia’s Top Ten Tuesday: Freebie

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Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. This week’s topic is a list of ten Freebie (This week you get to come up with your own TTT topic!) For this freebie, I’m going to reuse an old topic that I didn’t get a chance to do: Longest books I’ve ever read.

Acheron by Sherrilyn Kenyon – 728 pages

Breaking Dawn by Stephenie Meyer – 756 pages

The Witness by Nora Roberts – 757 pages

Winter by Marisa Meyer – 827 pages

Inheritance by Christopher Paolini – 849 pages

Outlander by Diana Gabaldon – 850 pages

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling – 870 pages

Kingdom of Ash by Sarah J. Maas – 984 pages

The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss – 994 pages

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas – 1276 pages

What really long books have you read? Thanks for reading!

The Worst Best Man by Mia Sosa

GoodReads Summary:
Critically acclaimed author Mia Sosa delivers a sassy, steamy enemies-to-lovers romantic comedy about a woman whose new job requires her to work side-by-side with the best man who ruined her wedding: her ex-fiancé’s infuriating, irritating, annoyingly handsome brother. Perfect for fans of Jasmine Guillory, Helen Hoang, and Sally Thorne!
A wedding planner left at the altar. Yeah, the irony isn’t lost on Carolina Santos, either. But despite that embarrassing blip from her past, Lina’s managed to make other people’s dreams come true as a top-tier wedding coordinator in DC. After impressing an influential guest, she’s offered an opportunity that could change her life. There’s just one hitch… she has to collaborate with the best (make that worst) man from her own failed nuptials.
Tired of living in his older brother’s shadow, marketing expert Max Hartley is determined to make his mark with a coveted hotel client looking to expand its brand. Then he learns he’ll be working with his brother’s whip-smart, stunning—absolutely off-limits—ex-fiancée. And she loathes him.
If they can survive the next few weeks and nail their presentation without killing each other, they’ll both come out ahead. Except Max has been public enemy number one ever since he encouraged his brother to jilt the bride, and Lina’s ready to dish out a little payback of her own.
But even the best laid plans can go awry, and soon Lina and Max discover animosity may not be the only emotion creating sparks between them. Still, this star-crossed couple can never be more than temporary playmates because Lina isn’t interested in falling in love and Max refuses to play runner-up to his brother ever again…
The Worst Best ManReview:
I picked this one up because as I’ve mentioned in many previous reviews that I’m on a romance kick. This is one that I’ve seen a ton of people talking about so I had to grab it when I saw it available as an eBook through my library.
I enjoyed this book for the most part. I liked the banter and familial aspects. The romance was interesting and believable. I loved how diverse it was and how Lina shares her culture with the people around her. This book definitely made me hungry. It also totally made me want to plan a wedding (which is silly because I’m already married.) I loved the competition aspect of the story as well. Lina is trying to get a job for a well-known hotel and help them add weddings to the many things they provide for their clientele.
I’m going to keep this review short because I don’t have all that much to say about this book. I enjoyed it, but I wasn’t totally comfortable with the whole falling in love with her ex-fiance’s brother concept. I get that Andrew’s the one that left her, but this was just a little unrealistic to me. I don’t know many people that would actually let this happen, let alone it ends up being a successful relationship. Despite this, the story was fun and entertaining.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black

GoodReads Summary:
Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.
Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.
At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.
Until one day, he does…
As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?
The Darkest Part of the ForestReview:
The Darkest Part of the Forest takes place in the same world as the Folk of the Air trilogy. Many were disappointed by the finale of that series and to those people I say, READ THIS BOOK RIGHT NOW. The Darkest Part of the Forest was everything I wanted from the Folk of the Air series. There were interesting and complex sibling relationships. There were romantic relationships that I was quickly invested in. Plus, there was all the fae drama that I loved from her other series, but more interesting.
The fae aspect of this story was so fascinating. This story takes place in the town of Fairfold where the fae come out to play with tourists. I loved this aspect of the story. The concept of magic in the world as I know it is so interesting to me. The fae in town don’t mess with the locals, only the tourists that come to see the horned boy in the glass coffin. The horned boy’s coffin is also the local’s party spot. This hit me in the high school feels because I totally partied in the woods during my high school years, so, I could totally see my friends in the party scenes with the horned boy.
When the coffin is found shattered and the horned boy awakes, life in Fairfold changes. I loved the relationship between Hazel and Ben. I really enjoyed getting to see their history. When they were children, they hunted fae with Ben using his musical ability and Hazel fighting them. There were some hard to read parts with these parts, but it just made the story that much better. Their relationship was so complicated and tangled, there were a lot of issues between them but I loved seeing them work through these issues and develop their relationships.
The romances were wonderful. I’m not going to specify who is with who because the wondering (for me) was a great part of the book. Both siblings find romance in these pages. Ben is gay and his romance was everything I wanted and more. The way his path led in this story was everything I wanted from Jude and Cardan. Hazel’s romance was also right up my alley. It was my favorite romance trope and I love how things turned out for them.
Overall, this book was so freaking good. I don’t know why more people haven’t read this. To all of the people that read and loved The Cruel Prince, please read this book because you will love this even more. The supporting characters were amazing. The mix of real-world and fae was great. I just loved everything about this book.

 

Quotes:

“Once, there was a girl who vowed she would save everyone in the world, but forgot herself.”

“Every child needs a tragedy to become truly interesting.”

“Down a path worn into the woods, past a stream and a hollowed-out log full of pill bugs and termites, was a glass coffin. It rested right on the ground, and in it slept a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives.”

“There don’t have to be first dates and second dates. We’re not normal. We can do this anyway you want. A relationship can be whatever you want it to be. We get to make this part up. We get to tell our own story.”

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Crave by Tracy Wolff

GoodReads Summary:
My whole world changed when I stepped inside the academy. Nothing is right about this place or the other students in it. Here I am, a mere mortal among gods…or monsters. I still can’t decide which of these warring factions I belong to, if I belong at all. I only know the one thing that unites them is their hatred of me.
Then there’s Jaxon Vega. A vampire with deadly secrets who hasn’t felt anything for a hundred years. But there’s something about him that calls to me, something broken in him that somehow fits with what’s broken in me.
Which could spell death for us all.
Because Jaxon walled himself off for a reason. And now someone wants to wake a sleeping monster, and I’m wondering if I was brought here intentionally—as the bait.
Crave (Crave, #1)Review:
Everyone and their brother have been talking about this book. So, of course, I was curious to see what the hype was about. Sadly, I didn’t love this. It was definitely fun and it was definitely entertaining, but it wasn’t anything to write home about.
We’re following Grace as she is forced to move to Alaska and attend the boarding school that her Uncle is the headmaster of. Her parents died in a car crash and she’s feeling a bit lost. But she has her cousin, Macy, and I loved their relationship. They quickly become friends, as they share a room. The only thing that I didn’t like about their relationship was that Macy was a terrible liar. Grace has found herself in a school full of supernatural creatures except she doesn’t know that fact. So, Macy lies to her at the direction of her father. Macy is a terrible liar and I really don’t understand how Grace didn’t see right through her. That was my biggest issue with this book. It was so glaringly obvious that Grace was surrounded by supernaturals but somehow, she didn’t see it. I couldn’t tell if the author made it so obvious on purpose or not, but I didn’t like that.
Aside from that part, I thought the creativity of the supernatural creatures in this story was interesting. A school filled with witches, shapeshifting wolves and dragons, and vampires. This is the kind of thing I live for. I loved the politics between the species and the drama, oh the high school drama. The drama and politics were so entertaining. This was the part that really kept the story going.
Overall, I wasn’t blown away by this book but it was definitely a fun read. I will probably read the second book but this one won’t be making my favorites list.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

Aru Shah and the Tree of Wishes by Roshani Chokshi

GoodReads Summary:
War between the devas and the demons is imminent, and the Otherworld is on high alert. When intelligence from the human world reveals that the Sleeper is holding a powerful clairvoyant and her sister captive, 14-year-old Aru and her friends launch a search-and-rescue mission. The captives, a pair of twins, turn out to be the newest Pandava sisters, though, according to a prophecy, one sister is not true.
During the celebration of Holi, the heavenly attendants stage a massage PR rebranding campaign to convince everyone that the Pandavas are to be trusted. As much as Aru relishes the attention, she fears that she is destined to bring destruction to her sisters, as the Sleeper has predicted. Aru believes that the only way to prove her reputation is to find the Kalpavriksha, the wish-granting tree that came out of the Ocean of Milk when it was churned. If she can reach it before the Sleeper, perhaps she can turn everything around with one wish.
Careful what you wish for, Aru…
Aru Shah and the Tree of Wishes (Pandava Quartet #3)Review:
I have a fierce love for this series. I love Aru Shah with my whole heart. So, I’m not sure how I’m going to explain my feelings for this book. I might just keep this short and tell you to read it a hundred times and then end it. Just kidding.
We’re following Aru, Mini, and Brynn as their trying to save the world from the Sleeper. There’s also Aidan and Rudy that tag along with the girls. I love this found family so much. We find two new Pandava sisters at the start of this story. Twins named Sheela and Nikita, who have very interesting abilities. I loved how quickly the three pull Sheela and Nikita into their loving arms. I love that even though most of them have families to go back to that are loving and supportive, these sisters (and Aidan and Rudy) have made a family of their own. The found family aspect of this story was so wonderful.
The stakes have never been higher for this group. They’ve failed a few minor missions and are feeling lower than low. So, they take off on their own without permission from the higher-ups. I loved the nonstop action of the story, even while they were just traveling from one task to the next, they were met with challenges that they faced bravely and always together.
Overall, I adored this story just like all the previous books. I am already dying for the next installment to know what happens next. The friendships are wonderful, the writing is amazing. I adore the world and the mythology that this story centers around. I love everything about this book and the rest of the series. If you haven’t read it yet you’re really missing out.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

The Year They Fell by David Kreizman

GoodReads Summary:
When a horrible tragedy unites five very different high school seniors, they discover the worst moment of your life can help determine who you really are in the powerful YA novel, The Year They Fell.
Josie, Jack, Archie, Harrison, and Dayana were inseparable as preschoolers. But that was before high school, before parties and football and getting into the right college. Now, as senior year approaches, they’re basically strangers to each other.
Until they’re pulled back together when their parents die in a plane crash. These former friends are suddenly on their own. And they’re the only people who can really understand how that feels.
To survive, the group must face the issues that drove them apart, reveal secrets they’ve kept since childhood, and discover who they’re meant to be. And in the face of public scrutiny, they’ll confront mysteries their parents left behind–betrayals that threaten to break the friendships apart again.
A new family is forged in this heartbreaking, funny, and surprising book from award-winning storyteller David Kreizman. It’s a deeply felt, complex journey into adulthood, exploring issues of grief, sexual assault, racism, and trauma.
The Year They FellReview:
I was intrigued by the synopsis of this book when I was researching 2019 releases last year. The cover is what pulled me in first because it’s stunning, but then the concept of the story is when I knew I had to read it.
The Year They Fell was devastating, but also somehow uplifting. We follow ‘the sunnies’ who are a group of friends that all went to preschool together. They drifted apart over the years and are no longer really friends at all. Their parents are all still friends though, and when they’re headed to vacation together, their plane crashes killing everyone that was on it. Only Daya’s parents survive because they never made it on the plane.
These five kids are going through something terrible, and you’d think they’d try to do it together since they’re all dealing with the same thing, but that’s not really how it happens. I liked that their story wasn’t predictable. I liked that it was different and heart-wrenching.
Each character gets their own perspective, which is tough to do and be able to give them each a distinct and different personality and voice. I think the author did well with this with one exception. Archie and Harrison. I had a hard time remembering which was which. One was an only child and had severe anxiety, thought all of them were anxious at one point or another. The other was adopted and had a younger brother. Both were a little nerdy. I liked all of the characters. I liked the journey from who they had become into who they were going to be now after this devastating loss.
Overall, this story was wonderfully diverse. There were all sorts of different relationship dynamics at play and I loved them all, friendships and romances. I will definitely be reading more by this author in the future.

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.

WWW Wednesday

Hey, bookworms! It’s that day of the week again where we participate in the wonderful bookish post that is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To play along just answer three questions to give an update about what you’re currently reading, going to read next, and have read recently.

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What are you currently reading?

Amanda- I’m currently reading A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor by Hank Green. I’m also listening to the audiobook for Burn Our Bodies Down by Rory Power (it’s incredible. This narrator is amazing and the story is perfect for spooky season.)

Antonia- I’m currently reading The Last Namsara by Kristen Cicarelli.

What did you recently finish reading?

Amanda- I most recently finished Girl, Serpent, Thorn by Melissa Bashardoust.

Antonia- I most recently finished Well Met by Jen DeLuca.

What do you think you will read next?

Amanda- I have no idea what I’m going to read next. I just got some books for me birthday and I’m thoroughly overwhelmed.

Antonia- I’m not sure what I’ll read next.

Thanks for reading. Let us know what you’re reading in the comments!

Amanda’s Top Ten Tuesday – Book Festivals

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each week we talk about our top ten with a different topic provided by Jana. This week’s topic is Book Events/Festivals I’d Love to Go to Someday. This is going to be a short one for me because there’s only a few I’d like to go to.

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BookCon (in New York). I had serious FOMO last year when I saw all my friends at this event last year. I’d like to go eventually, but obviously, that won’t happen this year.

YallWest I love the west coast and I’d love to attend this one.

ALA Conference I could have gone to this one last year and I’m sad that I didn’t.

Baltimore Book Festival is one I missed last year too. But I’m hoping it will still happen for 2020.

Apollycon is run by one of my favorite authors and I keep convincing myself not to go because of the ticket prices.

These are the book festivals I’d love to go to. I’m sure there are more I’d like to go to, but these are the well-known ones. Which ones are on your list?

Keep on reading lovelies, Amanda.